Ipomoea capillacea (Kunth) G. Don
Family: Convolvulaceae
purple morning-glory,  more...
[Convolvulus capillaceus Kunth]
Ipomoea capillacea image
Sue Carnahan  
Plant: perennial herb; from elongated tubers; stems erect to ascending glabrous Leaves: sessile, incised and appearing compound, the segments usually 5, linear or only tooth-like, 5-15 mm long INFLORESCENCE: axillary, flowers solitary on peduncles 5-7 mm long; bracts caducous Flowers: on pedicels 3-6 mm long, reflexed in fruit, the bracteoles scale-like; sepals 5-6 mm long, acute to obtuse and mucronate apically, the outer sepals 2 mm wide, elliptic to oblong, the inner sepals 3 mm wide, ovate, muricate-tuberculate at least on the midvein; corollas funnelform, 3-4 cm long, lavender to red-purple, glabrous, the limb 2-2.5 cm wide; stamens 18-21 mm long, included, the anthers 1-1.5 mm long; ovary ovoid, 2-locular, glabrous; styles 18-20 mm long Fruit: FRUITS globose capsules, 4-5 mm wide, the apiculum 1 mm long. SEEDS 1-4, 3 mm long, ovoid, black to dark brown, shortly erect-hispid Misc: Oak woodlands, plains, ponderosa pine zone; 1500-2500 m (5000-8200 ft); Jul-Sep REFERENCES: Austin, Daniel F. 1998. J. Ariz. - Nev. Acad. Sci. Convolvulaceae 30(2): 61.
Austin 1998
Duration: Perennial Nativity: Native Lifeform: Forb/Herb General: Perennial herb arising from elongated tubers, erect to ascending, glabrous. Leaves: Thin and linear, incised and appearing compound, edges of divisions often rolled inwards, generally with 5 divisions, sometimes individual divisions reduced to small nubs, 5-15 mm long. Flowers: Purple, lavender, or reddish, funnelform, 3-4 cm long, outer sepals 3-6 mm long, with noticeable outgrowths, elliptic to oblong, stamens included, 18-20 mm, anthers 1-1.5 mm, ovary with 2 locules. Borne on peduncles 5-7 mm long. Fruits: Round capsules, 4-5 mm wide, with 1-4 black or brown ovoid seeds, to 3 mm. Ecology: Found in pine forests, oak woodlands, and plains, from 5,000-8,500 ft (1524-2438 m); flowering July-September. Notes: This lovely morning-glory is distinguished by its large, purple flowers and divided leaves. Leaves tend to be ascending up the stem. This species looks similar at first glance to Ipomea plummerae. However, I. plummerae has larger leaves and the flowers are borne on longer peduncles. Also note the presence of the outgrowths on the sepals, which are not present on I. plummerae. Ethnobotany: There is no specific use for this species, but the genus was used as an emetic, to treat worms and constipation, as a tonic, to treat asthma, and the tubers were used as food. Synonyms: Convolvulus capillaceus, Ipomoea muricata Editor: LCrumbacher, 2011
Ipomoea capillacea image
Patrick Alexander  
Ipomoea capillacea image
Patrick Alexander  
Ipomoea capillacea image
Patrick Alexander  
Ipomoea capillacea image
Patrick Alexander  
Ipomoea capillacea image
Patrick Alexander  
Ipomoea capillacea image
Patrick Alexander  
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image
Ipomoea capillacea image