Solanum lumholtzianum Bartlett
Family: Solanaceae
Sonoran nightshade,  more...
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Thomas Van Devender  
PLANT: Annual herbs, taprooted, without tubers or stolons, 20-70 cm tall, pubescent, armed with prickles 4-9 mm long; hairs up to 0.7 mm long, simple over most of the plant, frequently gland-tipped. LEAVES: alternate, deeply dissected, bipinnatifid to tripinnatifid or compound, broadly ovate, 5-13 cm long, with stellate trichomes and simple, gland-tipped trichomes on the upper and lower surface, the stellate trichomes with 4-5 rays, the main veins armed with scattered prickles; petioles 2.5-7 cm long, armed with prickles; base of leaf or leaflets variable, acute to subcordate; apices of ultimate lobes obtuse to acute. INFLORESCENCE: 3-8 cm long, raceme-like monochasialcymes, 6-10-flowered, peduncles 0.5-3 cm long. FLOWERS: somewhat zygomorphic, perfect or having nonfunctional stigmas and abortive ovules in the terminal portions of the inflorescence; pedicel 0.5-1.5 cm long; calyx campanulate, the tube 1.8-2.2 mm long, the lobes linear-lanceolate, 5-12 mm long; corollas stellate, 1.3-1.8 cm wide, yellow; stamens unequal; anthers oblong, of three sizes, the lowermost extended anther 6.5-8.6 mm long, occasionally purple-tinged, incurved at the tip, the two adjacent shorter anthers 5.6-7.5 mm long, also terminally incurved, the uppermost shortest pair 4.5-6 mm long; filaments ca. 1/4 as long as the anthers; styles slender, extending out beyond the anthers; stigmas to 0.5 mm across. FRUITS: broadly ovoid, 1.1-1.4 cm in diam., tightly invested by the densely armed accresent tube of the calyx; seeds dark brown, 3-3.5 mm long, broadly ovate to suborbicular, radially ridged. NOTES: Sandy or gravelly soils of washes, stream-banks, hillsides, or occasionally roadsides: Pima, Santa Cruz cos. (Fig. 2C); 1020-1400 m (3350-4550 ft); Jul-Oct; s AZ; n Mex. REFERENCES: Chiang, F. and L.R. Landrum. Vascular Plants of Arizona: Solanaceae Part Three: Lycium. CANOTIA 5 (1): 17-26, 2009.
Chiang et al. 2009, Kearney and Peebles 1969
Duration: Annual Nativity: Native Lifeform: Forb/Herb General: Herbaceous annuals, stems 20-70 cm tall, surfaces pubescent, armed with prickles 4-9 mm long, the spines, when fresh, nearly black at the base, surfaces also with hairs up to 0.7 mm long and frequently gland-tipped, plants taprooted, without tubers or stolons. Leaves: Alternate, deeply dissected, bipinnatifid to tripinnatifid or compound, broadly ovate in outline, leaf segments linear or lanceolate, acute or acutish, 5-13 cm long, bases of leaf or leaflets variable, acute to subcordate, apices of ultimate lobes obtuse to acute, surfaces with stellate trichomes and simple, gland-tipped trichomes on the upper and lower surface, the stellate trichomes with 4-5 rays, the main veins armed with scattered prickles, petioles 2.5-7 cm long, armed with prickles. Flowers: Yellow, corollas stellate, somewhat zygomorphic, 1.3-1.8 cm wide, perfect or having nonfunctional stigmas and abortive ovules in the terminal portions of the inflorescences, calyxes campanulate, tubes 1.8-2.2 mm long, lobes linear-lanceolate, 5-12 mm long, stamens unequal, anthers oblong, of three sizes, the lowermost extended anther 6.5-8.6 mm long, occasionally purple-tinged, incurved at the tip, the two adjacent shorter anthers 5.6-7.5 mm long, also terminally incurved, the uppermost shortest pair 4.5-6 mm long, filaments one-fourth as long as anthers, styles slender, extending out beyond the anthers, stigmas to 0.5 mm across, inflorescences 3-8 cm long, raceme-like, 6-10-flowered, peduncles 0.5-3 cm long, pedicels 0.5-1.5 cm long. Fruits: Berries, broadly ovoid, 1.1-1.4 cm in diameter, tightly invested by the densely armed accresent tube of the calyx, seeds dark brown, 3-3.5 mm long, broadly ovate to suborbicular and radially ridged. Ecology: Found on sandy or gravelly soils, in washes, on stream-banks, hillsides, or occasionally roadsides, from 3,000-4,000 ft (914-1219 m); flowering July-October. Distribution: Arizona; Mexico. Notes: Look for this species in Santa Cruz and Pima counties in Arizona. Ethnobotany: Unknown, but other species in the genus have uses; decoction of root taken as a general tonic, for tuberculosis, heart trouble, and fruits used to prepare a permanent blue dye for tattooing. Synonyms: None Editor: LCrumbacher2012 Etymology: Solanum is Latin for "quieting," in reference to the narcotic properties of some species, the meaning of lumholtzianum is unknown.
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Montañez-Armenta, María de la Paz  
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Montañez-Armenta, María de la Paz  
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Thomas Van Devender  
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Thomas Van Devender  
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Sue Carnahan  
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Thomas Van Devender  
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Sue Carnahan  
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Solanum lumholtzianum image
Solanum lumholtzianum image