Proboscidea louisianica (P. Mill.) Thellung  
Family: Martyniaceae
[Proboscidea louisiana (Mill.) Wooton & Standl.]
Proboscidea louisianica image
Kurt Stueber  
Annual herb to 0.6 m tall and 2 m wide Stem: thick, branched, sprawling-ascending, covered with glandular hairs, foul-scented. Leaves: opposite, upper leaves sometimes alternate, long-stalked, to 25 cm long, rounded to kidney- or heart-shaped, irregularly wavy to non-toothed, covered with dense glandular hairs, foul-scented. Flowers: borne in clusters (racemes) of eight to twenty. The petals are dull white to lavender with spotted purple and yellow, 3.5 - 5.5 cm long, fused into a tube that is swollen on one side, somewhat two-lipped, and five-lobed. Fruit: a four-chambered capsule with a fleshy outer covering, the covering splitting along two lines to separate from the woody center, 10 - 20 cm long, with two long curved beaks at the tip.

Similar species: Proboscidea louisianica is represented by one subspecies in the Chicago Region. See link below for further information.

Flowering: July to September

Habitat and ecology: Introduced from farther south. This species is rare in the Chicago region, growing in open areas with sandy soil.

Occurence in the Chicago region: non-native

Notes: This species is sometimes cultivated to make pickles.

Etymology: Proboscidea means snout-like, referring to the long beaks of the fruit. Louisianica means "from Louisiana."

Author: The Morton Arboretum

Proboscidea louisianica image
DeanWm. Taylor  
Proboscidea louisianica image
J. E.(Jed) and Bonnie McClellan  
Proboscidea louisianica image
Kurt Stueber  
Proboscidea louisianica image
Kurt Stueber  
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