Horsfordia newberryi (S. Wats.) A. Gray
Family: Malvaceae
Newberry's velvetmallow,  more...
[Abutilon newberryi S. Wats.]
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Barry Breckling  
Plant: shrub; 2-3 m tall, densely and roughly pubescent Leaves: ovate to lanceolate (1.5-4 times as long as wide), obscurely denticulate, mostly 4-10 cm long INFLORESCENCE: solitary in the leaf axils or on axillary racemes Flowers: calyx 5-6 mm long; petals yellow, 6-9 mm long Fruit: FRUITS sparsely pubescent schizocarp, 7-8 mm long; mericarps ca. 10, winged and often purplish distally, with a solitary seed in the basal cell and 2 seeds in the upper cell; SEEDS 2.2 mm long, pubescent, the hairs less than 0.5 mm long Misc: Dry rocky hillsides; 300-1100 m (1000-3500 ft); flowering throughout the year Notes: dense yellowish hairs cover plant References: P. Fryxell - Malvaceae - JANAS 27:222-236.J.C. Hickman, ed. The Jepson Manual.ASU specimens.
Felger 2000, Fryxell 1993
Common Name: Newberry's velvetmallow Duration: Perennial Nativity: Native Lifeform: Subshrub General: Shrubs 2-3 m, often thin and few-branched, branches with yellowish pubescence. Leaves: Leaves thick, pubescent and soft, ovate to lanceolate, 4-10 cm long. Flowers: Solitary in the leaf axils or on axillary racemes, small, calyx 5-6 mm long, petals 6-9 mm long, bright orange, to yellow. Fruits: Schizocarp sparsely puberulent 7-8 mm with winged mericarps or capsules, lower mericarp chamber 1 seeded, upper chamber 1-2 seeded. Ecology: Found on dry sites often on volcanic or granitic substrates on rocky or gravelly slopes, canyons, and arroyos from 1,000-3,500 ft (305-1067 m), flowers throughout the year. Distribution: Ranges across southern Arizona, south to Baja California and Sonora and west to California. Notes: Distinguished in the genus by the yellow flowers and within the family by the calyx not being inflated and having fewer mericarps than Abutilon and having a prominent wing at the apex of the mericarp. Ethnobotany: Unknown Etymology: Horsfordia is named after Frederick Hinsdale Horsford (1855-1923), a New England botanist and collector, while newberryi is named after John Strong Newberry (1822-1892), an American physician, geologist, paleontologist and botanist. Synonyms: None Editor: LCrumbacher, 2011
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J. E.(Jed) and Bonnie McClellan  
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Barry Breckling  
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Sue Carnahan  
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