Hibiscus denudatus Benth.  
Family: Malvaceae
paleface,  more...
[Hibiscus denudatus var. involucellatus A. Gray,  more]
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Frankie Coburn  
Plant: Subshrub; 0.5-1 m tall, the stems densely stellate-tomentose. Leaves: ovate to orbicular, dentate to subentire, densely tomentose, 1.5-3 cm long Flowers: solitary, short-pedicellate; bracts of involucel 0.5-4 mm long (or absent); calyx 11-15 mm long; petals 2-2.7 cm long. lavender or white, usually with a purplish spot at base Fruit: FRUITS capsule, globose, glabrous or pubescent apically, 7-8 mm long. SEEDS 2.5 mm long, sericeous, the hairs 3-4 mm long Misc: Deserts, washes and dry slopes; below 1100 m (3500 ft); flowering throughout the year Notes: seeds are hairy References: P. Fryxell - Malvaceae - JANAS 27:222-236.J.C. Hickman, ed. The Jepson Manual.Kearney & Peebles. Arizona Flora.ASU specimens.
Felger 2000, Fryxell 1993
Common Name: paleface Duration: Perennial Nativity: Native Lifeform: Subshrub General: Shrubs from 0.5-1 m, grayish-green pubescent stems with stellate hairs branching from the base. Leaves: Alternate, broadly ovate to obovate, 1.5-3 cm long, leaf margins entire to dentate, veins prominent beneath, densely tomentose. Flowers: Short pedicellate, calyx 11-15 cm long, petals whitish-pink to purple, yellow with maroon spot near the base, 2-2.5 cm long. Fruits: Globose capsule with seeds covered with long silky hairs, 7-8 mm long. Ecology: Found on rocky or gravelly slopes, bajadas, and washes below 3,500 ft (1067 m), flowers in spring. Distribution: Ranges across central and southern Arizona, from California to Texas and south to Durango and onto Baja California. Notes: Distinguished by the being an ascending gray-bluish-green perennial herb or subshrub with many branching stems from the base with stellate hairs; ovate or obovate, toothed, densely long-hairy leaves; and especially the showy lavender flowers with dark red centers, red stigmas and the capsules full of hairy seeds. Ethnobotany: Specific use of species unknown, but uses for the genus include infusion of roots taken to purify the blood, buds and flowers chewed as a laxative, and leaves, stems, buds, and seeds chewed as a general strengthener. Etymology: Hibiscus is from the ancient Greek and Latin name for a mallow-like plant that is derived from Ibis, an Egyptian diety, denudatus means naked, denuded. Synonyms: Hybiscus denudatus var. involucellatus Editor: LCrumbacher and SBuckley 2011, FSCoburn 2015
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Robert A. Villa  
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Ries Lindley  
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Frankie Coburn  
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Liz Makings  
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Ries Lindley  
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Frankie Coburn  
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William Radke  
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Dave Sussman  
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Patrick Alexander  
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Sue Carnahan  
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Vera Markgraf  
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L.R. Landrum  
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Sue Carnahan  
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Sue Carnahan  
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Sue D. Carnahan  
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L.R. Landrum  
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Liz Makings  
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Sue Carnahan  
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Patrick Alexander  
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Patrick Alexander  
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David Sussman  
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David Sussman  
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David Sussman  
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Sue Carnahan  
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Ries Lindley  
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David Sussman  
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David Sussman  
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Sue Carnahan  
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David Sussman  
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Ries Lindley  
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Arizona State University Herbarium  
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