Ageratina paupercula (A. Gray) King & H.E. Robins.
Family: Asteraceae
Santa Rita snakeroot
[Eupatorium pauperculum A. Gray,  more]
Ageratina paupercula image
Max Licher  
Perennials or subshrubs, to 100 cm. Stems erect, puberulent to glabrate. Leaves opposite; pet-ioles 3-15 mm; blades narrowly to broadly lanceolate, (2-)3-7 × 0.5-1.5 cm, margins coarsely and remotely serrate, apices long-acuminate, abaxial faces sparsely pubescent. Heads clustered. Peduncles 2-6 mm, puberulent. Involucres 2.5-3 mm. Phyllaries: apices acute, abaxial faces puberulent-hispidulous. Corollas white, lobes sparsely hispid-villous. Cypselae glabrous. Flowering Mar-May. Rocky slopes, crevices, gravelly, sandy streambeds, pine-oak woodlands; 1000-1800 m; Ariz.; Mexico. Ageratina paupercula is recognized by its early spring flowering, relatively small and usually narrowly lanceolate and acuminate leaves, relatively small heads in clusters, and relatively small (1.2-1.4 mm versus mostly 2-3 mm in other species), glabrous cypselae.

FNA 2006, Kearney and Peebles 1969
Duration: Perennial Nativity: Native Lifeform: Forb/Herb General: Perennial herbs or subshrubs to 1 m tall; stems erect, puberulent to glabrate. Leaves: Opposite and petiolate, the petioles to 1.5 cm; blades to 7 cm long, narrowly lanceolate with a long-acuminate apex and serrate margins, sparsely pubescent on the lower surface. Flowers: Flower heads discoid, arranged in clusters, on 2-6 mm peduncles; involucre (the ring of bracts surrounding each flower head) 3 mm high, the bracts in 2-3 series, subequal, acuminate, pubescent on the outer surface; flowers are all discs (radial, bisexual, with a 5-lobed corolla), the corollas white, sparsely hispid-villous, with protruding stamens. Fruits: Achenes 1 mm, glabrous. Ecology: Found in canyons near streams, from 3,500-5,000 ft (1067-1524 m); flowers March-May. Distribution: s AZ and Sonora, MEX Notes: The keys to this species are the pubescent phyllaries (involucral bracts); the narrowly lanceolate leaves, 3 to 5 times as long as wide; and the flowering heads and achenes (seeds) which are relatively small compared to other Ageratina spp. Note also that this species flowers in the spring; other Ageratina commonly flower in the summer. Ethnobotany: Unknown Etymology: Ageratina is a dimunitive of Ageratum, which is from Greek ageratons for not growing old, while paupercula means poor. Synonyms: Eupatorium pauperculum, Kyrstenia paupercula Editor: SBuckley 2010, AHazelton 2015
Ageratina paupercula image
Max Licher  
Ageratina paupercula image
Max Licher  
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ries Lindley  
Ageratina paupercula image
Max Licher  
Ageratina paupercula image
Jillian Cowles  
Ageratina paupercula image
Jillian Cowles  
Ageratina paupercula image
Jillian Cowles  
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image
Ageratina paupercula image