Authors: Max Licher

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Families: 117
Genera: 546
Species: 1205
Total Taxa (details): 1227

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Deciduous small tree or large shrub, occasional in Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries, on the Rim Country, and in the head of some of the canyons in the Red Rock Country under the rim. Found both in the riparian zone in Oak Creek Canyon, and in more dry conditions in the pine forests on the rim. Our plants belong to ssp. cerulea (Raf.) R. Bolli - BLUE ELDERBERRY; Edward Gilbert 921 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 177 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 561 [ASU]
Perennial aquatic herb, known from Foxboro Lake on the Eastern Rim Country, and also found infrequently in Oak Creek Canyon
Annual monoecious herb, infrequent, disturbed areas in the Red Rock Country. Introduced from Tropical America; M. Licher 737 [ASC]
Annual monoecious herb, occasional, disturbed areas in the Red Rock Country and Oak Creek Canyon. Introduced from the central and eastern United States; M. Licher 889 [ASC]
Annual monoecious herb, rare in our area; one collection from just above the riparian area along Lower Oak Creek
Annual monoecious herb, absent, based on one collection from 1974 in Oak Creek Canyon. This plant shows up in scattered locations in Arizona, but apparently is rather infrequent overall. Introduced from the central and eastern United States.
Annual dioecious herb, locally frequent, disturbed areas at lower elevations in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain South, and Savanna
Annual monoecious herb, locally frequent in Oak Creek Canyon and its upper tributaries, and along the Rim Country; Edward Gilbert 970 [ASU] , M. Licher 13 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 480 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 825 [ASU] , more...
Annual monoecious herb, one population found in an abandoned field along Lower Oak Creek. Very similar to Amaranthus powellii, but tending to be more robust and with denser and stouter inflorescences. Introduced from the central and eastern United States
Annual monoecious herb, infrequent, scattered populations throughout the Red Rock Country and along Lower Oak Creek, generally in sandy flats.; M. Licher 714 [ASC] , M. Licher 904 [ASC]
Evergreen dioecious shrub, occasional to locally abundant in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, often in sandy washes and flats, and in alkaline soils. Our plants belong to var. canescens
Annual monoecious herb, infrequent overall, but locally abundant in the House Mountain area, often around cattle tanks or other disturbed sites, with a report from Red Rock State Park in the Lower Oak Creek area also
Annual monoecious herb, rare in our area, known from one collection in the riparian fringe along Lower Oak Creek
Annual monoecious herb, infrequent in the Red Rock Country in and around Sedona. Introduced from Eurasia; M. Licher 668 [ASC]
Annual herb, frequent weed of disturbed habitats in the Red Rock Country and in Oak Creek Canyon. Introduced from Europe. Determining the relative abundance and extent of range for this species and the following one is difficult, due to similar appearance of both. Microscopic examination of the seed coat is necessary for distinguishing the two, and this is typically not done in the field. In my experience, most observations are recorded as C. album, rather than C. berlandieri, and only a modest number of actual collections from our area exist for verification.; Edward Gilbert 862 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 790 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 790 [ASC]
Annual herb, occasional in the Red Rock Country and in Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries, up to the Rim Country. Documented collections show this species preferring natural habitats slightly more than C. album
Annual herb, infrequent along washes and roadsides in the Red Rock Country. Introduced from Eurasia. FNA Vol. 4 treats this taxon as Dysphania botrys (L.) Mosyakin and Clemants
Annual herb, infrequent in the upper reaches of the West Fork of Oak Creek, becoming more common near Flagstaff and on the Peaks. Our plants belong to var. parvicapitatum S.L. Welsh. USDA calls this variety synonymous with C. foliosum (Moench) Ascherson, but FNA explains that C. foliosum is an introduced Eurasian species, and also explains where some of the confusion came from.
Annual herb, frequent in the upper elevations of the Red Rock Country, in Oak Creek Canyon, and along the Rim Country, occasional at lower elevations throughout the rest of our area; Edward Gilbert 226 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 347 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 375 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 226 [ASC]
Annual herb, locally frequent in places along the Northern Rim Country, in Ponderosa Pine forests. FNA Vol. 4 treats this taxon as Dysphania graveolens (Willd.) Mosyakin and Clemants; Edward Gilbert 517 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 834 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 415 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 834 [ASC]
Annual herb, occasional in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, appearing to be the most arid adapted of our Goosefoots. Our specimens belong to var. occidentale Crawford
Annual herb, infrequent, known from a few locations growing as a roadside weed in the Sedona area. Introduced from Europe; M. Licher 372 [ASC]
Annual herb, occasional in the Red Rock Country, along Lower Oak Creek, in Oak Creek Canyon, and along the Rim Country. This appears to be our only narrow-leafed Chenopodium, but the taxonomy has been confusing in past treatments, and consequently C. leptophyllum and C. dessicatum show up in past records for the area. Current taxonomy according to FNA Vol. 4 has these three taxa as distinct species; Max Licher 14 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 852 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 404 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 404 [ASC]
Annual herb, occasional overall but often locally abundant weed in disturbed areas of the Red Rock Country, Savanna area, and along Lower Oak Creek. Introduced from Asia; M. Licher 888 [ASC]
Evergreen dioecious or polygamous shrub, occasional overall but often locally abundant in the House Mountain and Savanna areas, and less so in the Red Rock Country
Annual herb, locally abundant weed of disturbed habitats in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, and up into Oak Creek Canyon as well. Occasionally found in natural habitats, but not persisting there readily. Introduced from Eurasia; M. Licher 373A [ASC]
Perennial herb from a bulb, infrequent overall in our area, but sometimes locally abundant where found, on House Mountain and along the lower portion of the Eastern Rim Country, in more open grassland areas
Perennial herb from a bulb, absent, based on one collection from Sedona in 1957. It has also been collected just outside of our area near Red Tank Draw, so should be looked for in the House Mountain and Southern Gateway zones. It becomes locally abundant at lower elevations near Camp Verde
Perennial herb from a bulb, occasional in Oak Creek Canyon and the Red Rock Country canyons, and on the Rim Country in Pine Forest clearings. Our plants belong to var. palmeri (S. Wats.) Cronquist [Alium palmeri S. Wats.] - ASPEN ONION
Perennial herb from a bulb, locally frequent in places along the Eastern Rim Country near Foxboro Lake, in meadows and moister draws in the Ponderosa Pine Forests
Perennial herb from a bulb, locally abundant in meadows along the Eastern Rim Country east of Foxboro Lake only, with one old record from Oak Creek Canyon in 1928. More common further east and north of us on the Rim Country and around the Peaks in Flagstaff
Perennial herb from a bulb, infrequent populations along the lower elevations of the Eastern Rim Country, with scattered individuals found in the Red Rock Country canyons below, in open clearings
Deciduous shrub, rhizomatous, often forming thickets, occasional , primarily in Oak Creek Canyon, along lower Oak Creek, and other drainages; Edward Gilbert 777 [ASU]
Evergreen shrub, occasional to locally frequent, Chaparral and Pinyon Juniper habitats throughout the Red Rock Country and House Mountain
Deciduous shrub, occasional to locally frequent, Chaparral and Pinyon Juniper habitats throughout the Red Rock Country and House Mountain. While earlier floras have recognized several varieties in Arizona based on leaf pubescence and lobing, the recent treatment for the Arizona Flora in Canotia, Vol.3, Issue 2, does not, stating that ╥there are no consistent geographic patterns to the variation in these characters.╙ The authors treat all of our plants in the state as Rhus aromatica Ation var. trilobata (Nutt.) Gray. Actual field observation by local botanists does show, however, that the pubescent and glabrous individuals are distinctive, with the pubescent plants being more common in the Red Rock Country, and the glabrous individuals favoring the higher elevations, and having a stronger odor
Deciduous shrub, often climbing, occasional to locally frequent, riparian and adjacent mesic and shady habitats, more common in the upper canyons. The recent treatment for the Arizona Flora in Canotia, Vol.3, Issue 2, treats this as Toxicodendron radicans (L.) Kuntz var. rydbergii (Small ex Rydb.) D.S. Erskine; Edward Gilbert 961 [ASU]
Perennial herb, occasional, on rock walls, forest floor, and sometimes wash bottoms in Oak Creek Canyon and other canyons below the Mogollon Rim in the Red Rock Country; Edward Gilbert 558 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 558 [ASC]
Perennial aquatic herb, infrequent along Lower Oak Creek; M. Licher 639 [ASC]
Perennial aquatic herb, occasional in the riparian zone in Oak Creek Canyon and along Lower Oak Creek. There has been confusion in Arizona about this taxon since both the Arizona Flora and McDougall listed only Cicuta douglasii (DC.) Coult and Rose - WESTERN WATER HEMLOCK, for our state, and consequently, most of our specimens are so identified. However, USDA and Intermountain Flora relegate C. douglasii to the west coast exclusively, making all Arizona plants C. maculata. The lengthy discussion in Intermountain Flora says that although cytologically distinct, the two species are not so well delineated morphologically, making determination from herbarium specimens (especially those lacking mature fruit) difficult. For now, I am callling all of our plants C. maculata, and those that have been determined to variety fall under var. angustifolia Hook.
Annual herb, adventive in landscaping along Highway 89A in Sedona. Introduced from South America; M. Licher 1550 [ASC]
Perennial herb, occasional, open rocky soils in the Red Rock Country and House Mountain area
Annual herb, occasional, on open soil and under shrubs in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain area, and in the lower canyons
Perennial herb, occasional on the canyon floor in the West Fork of Oak Creek, infrequent in the lower canyons and draws along the Northern Rim Country.; Edward Gilbert 138 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 36 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 48 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 48 [ASC]
Perennial herb, infrequent, on shady canyon slopes.
Perennial herb, occasional to locally frequent, open soil throughout the Red Rock Country and into the lower canyons. Arizona plants belong to ssp. macdougalii (Coult. and Rose) Theobald [Lomatium macdougalii Coult. and Rose]
Perennial herb from a tuberous root, occasional, in open soil throughout the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and on both Rim Countrys. Our plants belong to var. parishii Jepson - PARISH'S BISCUITROOT, which has glabrous fruits, irregularly divided leaf segments longer than 2-3 mm, and tuberous thickened roots. Although K&P says that var. nevadense (with more finely dissected leaves and puberulent fruits) is found throughout the range of the species, the only good collections that I could find were from further north near the Utah border
Perennial herb, occasional on the forest floor in the upper canyons and on the Northern Rim Country.; Edward Gilbert 627 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 654 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 17 [ASU] , M. Licher 1557 [ASC] , more...
Perennial herb, occasional on the forest floor of Oak Creek Canyon. Osmorhiza depauperata differs from O. berteroi in having slightly shorter fruits with a concave to truncate beak, while O. berteroi has fruits with a concave/constricted and elongate beak. There are a number of collections from Oak Creek Canyon so identified in the herbaria; however, these specimens all have immature inflorescences, and I find it difficult to place them definitively in one species or the other. It is possible that they represent young individuals of O. berteroi. More observation & collection is needed to document this species in our area with fully mature fruit. Osmorhiza depauperata is commonly known from the San Francisco Peaks and Flagstaff area.
Biennial or Perennial herb, infrequent along Oak Creek as an escape from cultivation. Introduced from Eurasia; Edward Gilbert 182 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 182 [ARIZ] , E. Gilbert 182 [ASC]
Annual herb, occasional (sometimes locally abundant in good years), on the Northern Rim Country in Ponderosa Pine forests
Perennial herb, occasional, in the upper canyon bottoms and slopes along the Northern Rim Country. The leaves and flowers are edible, though the plant is usually not frequent enough to warrent collecting for food; Edward Gilbert 751 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 100 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 100 [ASC]
Annual herb, infrequent, in canyon bottoms and on slopes in the Red Rock Country
Perennial herb with rhizomes, occasional to locally frequent, in Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries, ranging down into Lower Oak Creek.; M. Licher 629 [ASC]
Perennial herb with rhizomes, occasional to locally frequent, in the canyon bottom of the West Fork of Oak Creek. This species represents a hybrid between Apocynum cannibinum L. and Apocynum androsaemifolium L; Edward Gilbert 919 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 93 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 69 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 69 [ASC]
Perennial herb, Occasional, open soils throughout the Red Rock Country, Savanna, and infrequently on the Rim Countrys
Perennial herb, infrequent, upper canyons and slopes, usually in forests.
Perennial herb, absent, based on one collection from Sedona in 1959
Perennial herb, infrequent, open, sandy soil in the Red Rock Country and washes south of House Mountain
Perennial herb, locally frequent in the Upper West Fork of Oak Creek streambed and its tributaries; Edward Gilbert 761 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 105 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 105 [ASC]
Perennial herb with rhizomes, often forming colonies in disturbed areas and road margins, occasional in the Red Rock Country and up into Oak Creek Canyon; M. Licher 670 [ASC]
Perennial herb, occasional in Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries, infrequent in the drier lower canyons.; Edward Gilbert 64 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 106 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 59 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 59 [ASC]
Perennial herb, trailing to vining, rare on open rocky hillsides along Lower Oak Creek. A lower elevation desert plant just barely ranging into our area
Perennial herb, trailing to vining, infrequent in the Red Rock Country and lower canyons
Perennial vining herb, occasional, climbing through shrubs in the Red Rock Country
Perennial vining herb, infrequent in our area, climbing through shrubs along Lower Oak Creek. Our plants belong to ssp. cynanchoides. This taxon becomes far more common at slightly lower elevations in the Verde Valley. Reports of Funastrum cynanchoides ssp. heterophyllum (Engelm. ex Torr.) Kartesz.- HARTWEG'S TWINEVINE [Sarcostemma cynanchoides var. hartwegii (Vail) R. Holm] are probably misidentifications of F. crispum
Perennial herb with rhizomes, and rooting at tips, locally abundant in Oak Creek Canyon and at the Stage Stop area, persisting as an escape from cultivation. Also still widely used as a landscape plant in the area. Introduced from Europe.; Edward Gilbert 875 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 875 [ASC]
Aquatic herb, locally abundant in still water areas (creek margins in slow moving sections, tanks, etc.). Our most common Duckweed.; Edward Gilbert 934 [ASU] , M. Licher 236 [ASC] , M. Licher 816 [ASC] , E. Gilbert 934 [ASC]
Aquatic herb, infrequent in Oak Creek Canyon and West Fork, based on collections by others at ASU, annotated by Landolt .
Aquatic herb, infrequent in Oak Creek Canyon, based on one collection by others at ASU, annotated by Landolt
Perennial herb, infrequent, shady areas of the canyon floor in West Fork and the upper reaches of Oak Creek Canyon.; Edward Gilbert 164 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 164 [ASC]
Perennial vining herb, infrequent but locally dense populations escaping from cultivation in Oak Creek Canyon. A European species often used in landscaping
Perennial succulent plant, rare in our area, known from several locations along Lower Oak Creek. This is one of the pre-Columbian cultivars, usually associated with Sinagua habitation areas
Perennial succulent plant, frequent from the Red Rock Country up through the canyons to the Rim Country, in Pinyon Juniper Woodland, Chaparral, and occasionally in pine forests along the Rim Country, usually in sunny exposed areas. Our most cold-tolerant Agave, and by far the most common of its genus in our area. This plant can be distinguished from all the other species by its compact rosette with many closely imbricate lanceolate to ovate leaves, all with the largest teeth towards the tips. The other species have rosettes that are generally more open in form, usually with larger teeth towards the center of the leaves, some with teeth of varying sizes. The pre-Columbian cultivars all have flowers with more creamy, lighter yellow colored flowers, and rarely if ever set fruit, reproducing primarily by offshoots from the parent rosette.
Perennial succulent plant, rare in our area, known from several locations along Lower Oak Creek and in the Red Rock Country canyons. This is also one of the pre-Columbian cultivars, usually associated with Sinagua habitation areas
Perennial succulent plant, rare in our area, known from a location along Lower Oak Creek, Dry Beaver Creek, and south of our area near Sacred Mountain (Beaver Creek). This is also one of the pre-Columbian cultivars, usually associated with Sinagua habitation areas.
Perennial succulent plant, rare in our area, known only from several locations along Lower Oak Creek. This is also one of the pre-Columbian cultivars, usually associated with Sinagua habitation areas.
Perennial herb, infrequently naturalized in Oak Creek Canyon, along Oak Creek, and on old ranch properties in the Sedona area. Introduced for cultivation from Europe
Perennial herb from a corm, frequent throughout the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, and occasionally up into Oak Creek Canyon and the other canyons under the Rim
Perennial herb, infrequent along the Northern Rim Country in Ponderosa Pine Forests, becoming more common further north and east of us at slightly higher elevations
Perennial herb with rhizomes, occasional in Oak Creek Canyon, West Fork, and the upper reaches of the Red Rock Country canyons, in shaded areas on the forest floor. Arizona plants belong to var. amplexicaule (Nutt.) LaFrankie. This species has wider leaves, and larger panicles of smaller flowers than the following species; Edward Gilbert 276 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 157 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 21 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 327 [ASU] , more...
Perennial herb with rhizomes, occasional in Oak Creek Canyon and West Fork, in similar habitats but less common than the previous one; M. Licher 160 [ASU] , M. Licher 160 [ASC]
Perennial succulent plant, occasional throughout the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, and up through the canyons to the Rim Country, more frequent on the Eastern Rim Country than on the northern rim
Perennial herb from a bulb, infrequent along the Northern Rim Country, in clearings in Ponderosa Pine Forests; M. Licher 576 [ASC]
Perennial succulent plant, frequent thoughout our area from the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas up through the canyons to the Rim Country, in both sunny locations and in wooded areas with partial shade.; Edward Gilbert 725 [ASU]
Perennial succulent plant, frequent throughout the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, thriving in parklike grassland and meadow areas in the Pinyon Juniper Woodland and Desert Scrub habitats.
Perennial succulent plant, infrequent in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas. It becomes more common at lower elevations in the Verde Valley near Cottonwood and Clarkdale.
Perennial herb, infrequent, growing on rocks in shady canyon habitats below the Rim Country; Edward Gilbert 963 [ASU]
Perennial herb, rare in our area, growing on rocks in shady canyon habitats; our only collections are from Secret Canyon
Perennial herb, infrequent, growing on rocks in shady canyon habitats below the North Rim Country; Edward Gilbert 339 [ASU]
Perennial herb, occasional in the upper canyon draws along the Rim Country, and infrequently ranging down Oak Creek Canyon into the Red Rock Country.; Edward Gilbert 409 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 409 [ARIZ]
Perennial herb, infrequent overall but locally abundant, growing in colonies where it is found at the southern fringe of the Red Rock Country and House Mountain, often under and around Mesquite and other Sonoran Desert Scrub shrubs
Perennial herb, occasional throughout the Red Rock Country, usually as widely spaced individuals in the Pinyon Juniper or Chaparral communities.
Perennial herb, infrequent as a weed along highway margins and disturbed sites in Oak Creek Canyon and the Red Rock Country, forming colonies from extensive rhizomes. More common on the rim country closer to Flagstaff. On the Noxious Weed List in Arizona.; M. Licher 1555 [ASC]
Suffrutescent perennial herb, Infrequent on rocky hillsides along Lower Oak Creek and Dry Beaver Creek. More common at lower elevations south of our area.
Perennial herb, occasional in forested areas of the upper canyons and draws along the Rim Country; Edward Gilbert 333 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 333 [ASC]
Perennial herb, rare, known from two collections in sheltered areas of the lower canyons in the Red Rock Country. Growing in bedrock cracks or cobbles under pour-offs. This represents a significant range extension from its previously known range in southern Arizona
Biennial herb, frequent along the Rim Countrys and in Upper Oak Creek, infrequently ranging down into the Red Rock Country along washes and riparian areas. FNA Vol. 21 treats this taxon as Amauriopsis dissecta (A. Gray) Rydberg.; Edward Gilbert 421 [ASU]
Annual herb, occasional in disturbed areas and along roadways throughout our area below the Rim Country
Perennial herb from rhizomes forming extensive colonies, frequent in open areas of the lower elevations, throughout the Red Rock Country, House Mountain South, and Savanna West
Shrub, infrequent in our area, found along the Hwy 89A shoulders west of Sedona, perhaps adventive after the highway expansion. It is found naturally at slightly lower elevations in the Verde Valley, often in dry wash beds. The new treatyment in FNA now places this taxon in Ambrosia, as Ambrosia monogyra (Torr. and Gray ex Gray) Strother and B.G. Baldwin; M. Licher 1532b [ASC]
Perennial herb from rhizomes forming extensive colonies, occasional along washes the lower elevations, more frequent on the Rim Country in forested areas and washbeds; Edward Gilbert 390 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 390 [ASC]
Perennial herb from rhizomes forming extensive colonies, locally known only from the margins of Foxboro Lake on the Eastern Rim Country. This is the most common Ambrosia further north and east, often in similar disturbed habitats around tanks.
Annual herb, infrequent in disturbed areas in the Red Rock Country and along
Perennial herb with rhizomes, forming clumps, occasional in the riparian area in Upper Oak Creek and West Fork.; Edward Gilbert 260 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 298 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 260 [ASC]
Perennial herb, occasional on the forest floor in the West Fork of Oak Creek and along the Rim Country; Edward Gilbert 592 [ASU]
Perennial herb, infrequent on the forest floor in the upper reaches of the West Fork of Oak Creek, and at Foxboro Lake on the Eastern Rim Country; Edward Gilbert 588 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 583 [ASU]
Perennial herb, infrequent on the forest floor in the upper reaches of the West Fork of Oak Creek, and along the Rim Country, becoming more frequent at higher elevations near Flagstaff; Edward Gilbert 591 [ASU]
Annual herb, rare in our area, one collection from Dry Beaver Creek in the House Mountain area. Introduced from Europe
Biennial herb, locally frequent along washes and in sandy flats throughout the Red Rock Country, and occasional in similar habitats on the Rim Countrys
Perennial herb with rhizomes, frequent in Pine forests along the Rim Countrys, occasional in Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries, and rarely ranging downstream into the Red Rock Country; Edward Gilbert 366 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 826 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 826 [ASC]
Perennial herb with rhizomes, occasional along washes and in canyons throughout the area. This is the native species, non-aromatic typically, not the cultivated French variety of culinary use; Edward Gilbert 420 [ASU]
Perennial herb with rhizomes, frequent to locally abundant in most habitats throughout the area. One of our most widespread species; Edward Gilbert 474 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 474 [ARIZ]
Small shrub, infrequent on dry slopes and flats in the House Mountain area and along Lower Oak Creek
Shrub, occasional, in and near riparian areas in the Red Rock Country and along Lower Oak Creek
Shrub, occasional in Pinyon Juniper Woodland and Desert Scrub habitats throughout the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas
Shrub, occasional, in riparian areas only, in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and along Lower Oak Creek
Shrub, frequent, throughout the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Lower Oak Creek areas. Often along washes and roadways, seeming to thrive in somewhat disturbed areas
Suffrutescent perennial herb, appearing like a small shrub, rare in our area, known from one collection along Schnebly Hill Road in Sedona. Reported from other areas a little lower in elevation in the Verde Valley; M. Licher 640 [ASC]
Annual or biennial herb, locally frequent in the Red Rock Country and House Mountain areas, usually in open areas of the Pinyon Juniper or Desert Scrub zones, also thriving along roadways
Annual or biennial herb, infrequent, known in our area from a small population in a disturbed open flat in Red Rock State Park
Annual herb, infrequent in the riparian zone along Lower Oak Creek
Annual herb, absent, based on one collection from upper Oak Creek in 1956.
Deciduous shrub, occasional on rocky ledges and hillsides in the Red Rock Country and House Mountain areas
Perennial herb, occasional in wash bottoms and forested areas of canyons in the Red Rock Country and Upper Oak Creek; M. Licher 708 [ASU]
Deciduous shrub, frequent in most habitats throughout the entire area except the more shaded and moist sections of the upper canyons; Edward Gilbert 860 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 479 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 479 [ARIZ]
Perennial herb, infrequent on hillsides in forested areas of the upper canyons and draws along the Northern Rim Country; Edward Gilbert 837 [ASU]
Deciduous shrub, occasional to locally frequent in dry wash bottoms throughout the Red Rock Country
Perennial herb, occasional in the upper canyons of the Red Rock Country and in Upper Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries; Edward Gilbert 284 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 223 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 407 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 223 [ASC]
Deciduous shrub, occasional on xeric rocky ledges in the Red Rock Country
Deciduous shrub, absent, based on one anomalous collection by Deaver in 1946 from Oak Creek Canyon. The normal range of this taxon in to the north of us on the ColoradoPlateau. Arizona plants belong to var. linifolia (D.C. Eat.) Robins
Annual or perennial herb, occasional in Oak Creek Canyon and throughout the Red Rock Country, usually in disturbed areas along roadways or in riparian cobbles adjacent to Oak Creek, often forming dense local populations. Introduced from southeastern Europe. Appearing to be increasing its range in our area, creating a potential problem. Listed as a noxious weed in Arizona.
Annual herb, occasional in Sedona and disturbed areas in the Red Rock Country, often forming dense local populations. Introduced from southern Europe.
Annual herb, infrequent in Sedona and disturbed areas in the Red Rock Country, often forming dense local populations. Introduced from southern Europe. Listed as a noxious weed in Arizona; M. Licher 631 [ASC]
Biennial or perennial herb, based on one collection in our area from a disturbed roadside in a new Sedona subdivision, not persisting. Introduced from Eurasia. Listed as a noxious weed in Arizona
Perennial herb with rhizomes, occasional in the Red Rock Country and House Mountain areas, growing in open zones between shrubs
Annual or biennial herb, absent, known from one collection in Oak Creek Canyon, and one observation in a Sedona neighborhood. Probably occasionally escaping from cultivation, but apparently not readily persisting in our area. Introduced from Europe as a garden herb.
Biennial or perennial herb, occasional in the upper canyons of the Red Rock Country, in Oak Creek Canyon, and on the Rim Country, usually in forested areas. Past reports of Cirsium calcareum (Jones) Woot. and Standl. [Cirsium pulchellum (Greene ex. Rydb.) Woot. and Standl.] from or area remain unsubstantiated, with the only documented collections being from the Flagstaff area and further northeast. The new treratment in FNA relegates this taxon to a variety of the above species, as Cirsium arizonicum (Gray) Petrak var. bipinnatum (Eastwood) D.J. Keil. The FNA treatment describes this variety having primarily a Colorado Plateau range in Arizona. Our specimens would belong to the more widespread var. arizonicum.; Edward Gilbert 867 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 373 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 268 [ASU]
Biennial herb, occasional in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, often in open spaces along roadways and trails. Infrequently found at higher elevations, along the switchbacks at the head of Oak Creek Canyon.
Biennial or perennial herb, absent, known from one collection in Oak Creek Canyon. This species has been found infrequently in other parts of the Verde Valley, and becomes more common to the west near Prescott, often along road margins.
Biennial herb, occasional in the riparian zone of Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries, and infrequently in the forest on the Rim Country. Introduced from Europe. On the State noxious weed list and subject to official eradication programs, but not seeming to be increasing much in our area
Perennial herb, occasional in the upper reaches of West Fork and Oak Creek Canyon and in the forests along the Rim Country
Anual herb, infrequent, from a few collections in the Red Rock Country area: an abandoned pasture near Red Rock State Park, and a landscaped area adjacent to Highway 89A in Sedona. Introduced from South America; M. Licher 1551 [ASC]
Anual herb, abundant, found in most habitats throughout the entire area.; Edward Gilbert 387 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 344 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 332 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 332 [ASC]
Anual herb, occasional to locally abundant in wetland habitats on the Rim Country, and infrequently following waterways down into the Red Rock Country.; Edward Gilbert 410 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 410 [ASC]
Anual herb, infrequent in Pine Forests and clearings on the Northern Rim Country. More common towards Flagstaff, and just entering our area at Oak Creek Vista; M. Licher 326 [ASC]
Biennial to short-lived perennial herb, frequent throughout the entire study area, from the Red Rock Country and House Mountain to the Rim Country, found in most habitats but especially abundant in the Pinyon juniper of the Red Rock Country. This is the common purple aster of the late summer season for our area, and one that has been the subject of much taxonomic confusion. Our plants belong to var. glandulosa B.L. Turner. The new treatment in FNA calls this taxon Dieteria asteroides Torrey var. glandulosa (B.L. Turner) Morgan and Hartman. It is possible that Dieteria asteroides Torrey var. asteroides also could be found here. B.L. Turner's treatment indicates that this taxon has been collected within in the Verde Valley, and one local photo that he reviewed looked like that variety. However, all actual specimens that were sent to him for determination turned out to be var. glandulosa. D. asteroides var. asteroides is the taxon officially now synonymized with the former Aster tephrodes in FNA
Biennial to short-lived perennial herb, occasional on the Northern Rim Country. This taxon is common near Flagstaff and around the Peaks. Specimens in our area and around Flagstaff belong to var. ambigua B.L. Turner, or Dieteria canescens (Pursh.) Nuttall var. ambigua (B.L. Turner) Morgan and Hartmann, per FNA as above. This taxon has phylllaries that are mostly appressed, and only slightly glandular if at all. The phyllaries in M. asteroides are spreading to reflexed, and densly glandular in var. glandulosa, sparsley so in var. asteroides. M. asteroides also seems to be a bit taller and ╥weedier╙ in habit, compared to a more compact, lower, and denser flowered form for M. canescens var. ambigua; Edward Gilbert 393 [ASU]
Small shrub, drought deciduous, occasional in sparse Pinyon Juniper Woodland and desert scrub in the lower elevations of the Red Rock Country, in the House Mountain area, and on dry hillsides along Lower Oak Creek.
Shrub, evergreen, occasional throughout the the Red Rock Country
Shrub, evergreen, persisting in highway plantings and as an infrequent escapee from landscaping in and around Sedona. Not identified to variety. Several different varieties are naturally found around Flagstaff, and this becomes a dominant plant further north and east on the Colorado Plateau
Annual herb, infrequent in the West Fork of Oak Creek and its upper tributaries. G. Nesom annotated past specimens from our area to Erigeron divergens Torr. and Gray; however, I find it difficult to do so when keying out current specimens; E. Gilbert 255 [ASC]
Perennial herb, infrequent in the lover elevations of the Red Rock Country and in the House Mountain areas, usually in xeric open areas on hillsides
Biennial to short-lived perennial herb, abundant throughout the entire area, in most habitats from desert scrub to forests on the Rim Country. By far the most common species of the genus in our area; Edward Gilbert 710 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 775 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 255 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 710 [ASC]
Biennial to perennial herb, occasional throughout the entire area, in most habitats from Pinyon juniper in the Red Rock Country to forests on the Rim Country. Often forming locally dense colonies; Edward Gilbert 708 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 632 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 616 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 502 [ASU] , more...
Perennial herb, occasional in the upper reaches of the West Fork of Oak Creek and its tributaries, usually on the forest floor in draws and canyon bottoms. Often forming locally dense colonies; Edward Gilbert 772 [ASU]
Perennial herb, infrequent in forested and chaparral habitats in the Red Rock Country and Oak Creek Canyon. Seeming identical in habit and habitat to E. oreophilus Greenm., differing only in this species lacks glandular hairs; Edward Gilbert 1064 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 318 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 796 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert... 1064 [ARIZ]
Perennial herb, occasional in forested and chaparral habitats in the Red Rock Country and Oak Creek Canyon. More specimens key to this species than the previous one; Edward Gilbert 1063 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert... 1063 [ARIZ] , E. Gilbert 796 [ASC]
Perennial herb, infrequent on rocky ledges and cliff faces in Oak Creek Canyon and ite tributaries. On the USFS sensitive species list. In old texts this species was considered part of Erigeron pringlei Gray; Edward Gilbert 124 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 85 [ASU]
Perennial herb, occasional in forested habitats in Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries. Our specimens would seem to belong to var. macranthus (Nutt.) Cronq., if this variety is recognized. Without seeing comparative specimens from the eastern part of our stste, our specimens would key to Erigeron vreelandii Greene [Erigeron platyphyllus Greene], and herbarium records of this species exist from our area that have not been confirmed by Neesom:; Edward Gilbert 222 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 786 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 424 [ASU]
Annual or biennial herb, occasional on the Rim Country and in its upper draws, usually in open clearings, often forming locally dense colonies. The new treatment in FNA calls this taxon Erigeron tracyi Greene; Edward Gilbert 630 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 585 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 615 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 369 [ASU] , more...
Perennial herb, occasional in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain South, and Savanna West areas
Perennial herb, infrequent along Highway 89A in Oak Creek Canyon. Native in other parts of the southwest, but probably introduced in our area, often used in roadside wildflower planting mixes, and persisting in places.
Annual herb, found around Foxboro Lake only in our area, sometimes forming seasonally dense populations. This species is more common further north and east on the Rim Country, and thrives in the wetland margins around cattle tanks.; M. Licher 697 [ASC]
Perennial herb, infrequent at scattered locations in the Red Rock Country and on the Rim Country, becoming more frequent to the north and east just outside our area, thriving in disturbed areas. Reports of Grindelia squarrosa (Pursh) Dunal - CURLYCUP GUMWEED, from the area have not yet been confirmed by any collected specimens. This species becomes more common further to the northeast on the Colorado Plateau. The recent treatment of Grindelia in FNA combines both taxa under the latter name; M. Licher 680 [ASC]
Small shrub, infrequent in scattered locations in the Red Rock Country and Oak Creek Canyon; E. Gilbert 434 [ASC]
Small shrub, abundant in sunny and dry habitats throughout the entire area. One of our most common shrubby species; Edward Gilbert 434 [ASU]
Annual herb, occasional throughout the area, usually in disturbed habitats along roadsides, often forming locally dense populations; M. Licher 671a [ASC]
Perennial herb with rhizomes, rare in our area, known from one spring-fed wetland near Indian Gardens in Oak Creek Canyon; M. Licher 674 [ASC]
Annual herb, infrequent throughout the area, often in disturbed habitats, similar to H. annuus; M. Licher 671 [ASC]
Annual herb, occasional in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, Savanna, and lower section of Oak Creek Canyon, often forming locally dense populations. Thriving in drier habitats and at lower elevations than the following species.
Perennial herb, frequent on the Rim Country and in Upper Oak Creek Canyon, usually in Pine Forests; Edward Gilbert 389 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 389 [ASC]
Perennial herb, frequent throughout the area, from lower elevations of the Red Rock Country to the Rim Country, often in cobbles along washes. Most existing collections of this taxon have been previously identified as Heterotheca villosa (Pursh.) Shinners - HAIRY GOLDENASTER, based on keys in the old floras. The new treatment in FNA by John Semple for the genus places most of our specimens definitely in H. fulcrata, and communications with its author confirm its presence in Oak Creek Canyon and the Red Rock Country. These plants seem to be coarser and often taller in habit than the typical H. villosa on the Rim Country. Not identified to variety, although John Semple says that all four varieties may be found in our area; M. Licher 1644 [ASC] , M. Licher 1644B [ASC]
Annual to biennial herb, locally abundant on roadsides and in disturbed areas and old fields throughout the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, Savanna, and up into Oak Creek Canyon. Heterotheca grandiflora Nutt. - TELEGRAPH WEED, has been reported from the area, but after examining existing collections, those so designated turned out to be H. subaxillaris, and were so annotated. H. grandiflora is more common in California, and has spread at lower elevations into southern and western Arizona, but does not seem to make it this far north or east. It has a denser and grayer pubescence; Edward Gilbert 791 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 939 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 939 [ASC]
Perennial herb, infrequent on the Rim Country and upper canyon draws. More work needs to be done to verify which collections from our area truly belong here, and not in H. fulcrata. This species seems to become more dominant outside our area further north and east on the Rim Country; Edward Gilbert 181 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 853 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 357 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 181 [ASC]
Perennial herb, rare in our area, and representing a disjunct range extension from its normal range in southern Arizonz. Ed Gilbert collected one specimen from a pine forested slope in the uper reaches of the West Fork of Oak Creek during his thesis work on the Flora of West Fork; Edward Gilbert 384 [ASU]
Perennial herb, occasional on the forest floor in the upper reaches of Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries, and along the Rim Country; Edward Gilbert 676 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 702 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 659 [ASU]
Perennial herb, occasional in open areas of Pinyon Juniper throughout the Red Rock Country, and in pine forests along the Rim Country
Perennial herb, infrequent in pine forests along the Northern Rim Country.; M. Licher 612 [ASC]
Biennial or perennial herb, frequent throughout the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, in Pinyon juniper and desert scrub habitats, often thriving along roadsides and dry washes; M. Licher 348A [ASC]
Biennial or perennial herb, occasional on the Rim Country and in Oak Creek Canyon, infrequently found along washes at lower elevations in the Red Rock Country; Edward Gilbert 441 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 846 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 441 [ASC] , E. Gilbert 846 [ASC]
Perennial herb, occasional on the Northern Rim Country, in pine forests.; Edward Gilbert 587 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 597 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 597 [ASC]
Bienniall herb, occasional throughout the Red Rock Country, often forming dense local populations in Pinyon juniper habitat
Perennial herb, rare in our area, based on one collection from the West Fork of Oak Creek in 1967 and one on the Schnebly Hill Rim in 1979. This species becomes more frequent in Ponderosa Pine forests north of our area near Flagstaff and around the San Francisco Peaks
Perennial herb, occasional on the Eastern Rim Country, in Pinyon juniper and pine forests, becoming more frequent further east of Interstate 17
Evergreen shrub, infrequent in our area, found along the Hwy 89A shoulders west of Sedona, perhaps adventive after the highway expansion. It is found naturally at lower elevations south of the Verde Valley, often along roadsides; M. Licher 1515 [ASC]
Biennial herb, infrequent in Upper Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries, in pine forested canyon bottoms; Edward Gilbert 728 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 698 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 679 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 698 [ASC]
Biennial herb, unobserved, infrequent in our area, reported from Red Rock State Park and documented by two collections from Oak Creek Canyon in 1955 and 1973. Introduced from the central US
Annual herb, frequent in disturbed places throughout our area, and occasionally in most of our natural habitats from the Red Rock Country up to the Rim.
Annual herb, infrequent, in Pinyon juniper in the Red Rock Country to pine froests on the Rim Country. More common at lower elevations around Phoenix and Tucson.; M. Licher 891 [ASC] , M. Licher 1521 [ASC]
Annual herb, rare in our area, known from one collection in Arizona Cypress woodland in Dry Creek Canyon. More frequent on the rim country to the north of our area and around the San Francisco Peaks; M. Licher 1522 [ASC]
Annual herb, rare in our area, known from one collection in the same location as the previous species. Seemingly uncommon in northern Arizona, with its main range in the mountains of southern Arizona; M. Licher 1524 [ASC]
Annual herb, widespread in drier habitats throughout our area, from desert scrub to pine forests on the rim, but nowhere frequent; usually found as isolated individuals.; M. Licher 1114 [ASC]
Annual herb, rare in our area, known from one recent collection in the West Fork of Oak Creek Canyon, in the riparian area. Introduced from Europe, and found in scattered moist locations along the Mogollon Rim Country outside our area; Edward Gilbert 930 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 930 [ASC]
Annual herb, occasional in the Red Rock Country, often growing around the base of shrubs in more open areas
Annual herb, occasional in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, often but not exclusively in disturbed habitats along roadsides and trails. Our area is at the northern and higher elevation limits of this speciesÕ range
Annual herb, occasional in the Red Rock Country, often found in disturbed habitats as with the previous species; M. Licher 1435 [ASC] , M. Licher 638a [ASC]
Annual herb, infrequent in the Red Rock Country and on south facing slopes along the Northern Rim Country; Edward Gilbert 606 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 623 [ASU] , M. Licher 518 [ASC] , E. Gilbert 623 [ASC]
Annual herb, recorded for the first time in our area in 2009 as a locally abundant weed in a disturbed site at Crescent Moon Recreation Area in the Red Rock Country. Introduced from the Northwest US
Perennial herb, frequent in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna, often forming dense populations on bare soils in Pinyon juniper woodland
Perenniall herb , occasional in Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries, and in the upper reaches of canyons along the Northern Rim Country, in canyon bottoms and on shady moist hillsides. The new treatment in FNA places this species in the genus Mulgidium Cassini, as Mulgedium pulchellum (Pursh) G. Don; Edward Gilbert 703 [ASU] , M. Licher 1559 [ASC] , E. Gilbert 703 [ASC]
Biennial herb, infrequent in Oak Creek Canyon and the Red Rock Country, known from a few scattered infestations. Introduced from Europe. Listed as a noxious weed in Arizona; M. Licher 630 [ASC]
Perennial herb with rhizomes, infrequent in Upper Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries, usually forming populations in clearings on the forest floor; M. Licher 172 [ASU]
Perennial herb with rhizomes, frequent in Upper Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries, also occasional along the Rim Country; Edward Gilbert 580 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 116 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 549 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 554 [ASU]
Perennial herb with rhizomes, infrequent in the Red Rock Country, Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries, and along the Rim Country. Easy to mistake for immature specimens of the previous species; Edward Gilbert 913 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 887 [ASU] , M. Licher 500 [ASC]
Perennial herb, frequent throughout the entire area up to the Rim Country, where it then is found ocassionally. This is the most common species of this genus in our area, and the only one found in any numbers in the Red Rock Country. Reports of P. multilobata from the more open areas of the Red Rock Country are probably mis-identifications of this taxon, or more rarely, P. neomexicana; Edward Gilbert 675 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 645 [ASU] , M. Licher 171 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 618 [ASU]
Small shrub, usually evergreen, drought deciduous, frequent on open hillsides in the Red Rock Country and House Mountain, and into the lower reaches of Oak Creek Canyon. Associated predominantly with Pinyon juniper habitat, ranging down into desert scrub to the south
Annual herb, occasional in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, often forming seasonally dense populations in open spaces between trees and shrubs
Perennial herb, often appearing shrublike, infrequent in our area, found only in the upper reaches of canyons along the Rim Country. More common further north of our area; M. Licher 707 [ASC]
Perennial herb, occasional on rocky ledges and cliff faces in Oak Creek Canyon and the other canyons along the Northern Rim Country; Edward Gilbert 277 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 195 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 261 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 307 [ASU]
Suffrutescent perennial herb, rare in our area, known from one population on a south-facing rocky hillside above Lower Oak Creek. More common in the Sonoran Desert region to the south
Biennial or perennial herb, widespread and occasional throughout the entire area, from House Mountain and the Savanna through the Red Rock Country up to the Rim, in most habitats away from the riparian zone; Edward Gilbert 1065 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert... 1065 [ARIZ] , M. Licher 794 [ASC] , E. Gilbert 1065 [ASC]
Annual herb, absent, known from one collection ╥in the Sedona area on irrigated land╙ made in 1983. Introduced from Eurasia.
Annual or biennial herb, occasional in Oak Creek Canyon and its upper tributaries, and in the canyons along the Northern Rim Country; Edward Gilbert 465 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 475 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 475 [ARIZ] , M. Licher 1520 [ASC]
Annual or biennial herb, infrequent in and around the Sedona area, usually in moist or wet, disturbed areas; M. Licher 1115 [ASC] , M. Licher 546 [ASC]
Shrub, infrequent in the Red Rock area, known primarily from several locations along the Red Rock Loop Road margin and Red Rock State Park parking area. This is usually a lower elevation desert plant; perhaps our populations are adventive due to road construction work
Perennial herb, absent, known from one collection ╥10 miles this side of Sedona╙ made in 1970. This plant is found commonly north and east of Flagstaff on the Colorado Plateau.
Perennial herb, infrequent found along the Northern Rim Country, but there forming moderately large populations in open clearings in the Ponderosa Pine forest. More common further to the north and east on the rim country outside our area
Annual herb, infrequent in the Red Rock Country and Oak Creek Canyon, in Pinyon juniper and chaparral, often growing in the shelter of and up through larger shrubs
Perennial herb, occasional in Oak Creek Canyon and in the West Fork, growing along the creek in the riparian zone; Edward Gilbert 353 [ASU]
Annual herb, infrequent in the Red Rock Country and Savanna, with one collection from the Eastern Rim Country.
Perennial herb with rhizomes, infrequent along the Northern Rim Country, forming large populations in clearings in the Ponderosa Pine forest. More common to the north and east at higher elevations; M. Licher 571 [ASC]
Perennial herb, occasional in Oak Creek Canyon and the West Fork, usually in the canyon bottom but away from the riparian zone; Edward Gilbert 886 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 553 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 47 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 13 [ASU] , more...
Perennial herb, occasional in the upper reaches of the West Fork of Oak Creek and its tributaries, in pine forests; Edward Gilbert 422 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 422 [ASC]
Perennial herb, absent, based on one collection in the West Fork of Oak Creek by C. Deaver in 1928. Becoming more common on the Rim Country to the north, especially around the San Francisco Peaks
Suffrutescent perennial herb, occasional in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas. This variety is silvery tomentose.
Suffrutescent perennial herb, infrequent in the Red Rock Country and House Mountain areas. This variety is glabrous.
Suffrutescent perennial herb, infrequent along the Northern Rim Country and in the upper draws of the West Fork tributaries, in more open clearings or meadow-like areas. Becoming more common to the north near Flagstaff; Edward Gilbert 388 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 494 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 388 [ASC]
Perennial herb with rhizomes, occasional along the Northern Rim Country and in the upper draws of the West Fork and its tributaries, in Pine forests; M. Licher 168 [ASU]
Perennial herb with rhizomes, occasional in Oak Creek Canyon and the West Fork, preferring mesic habitats, often forming large colonies near the creek. This species will hybridize with S. velutina, and sometimes intermediates are encountered. The new treatment in FNA reinstates this taxon at the species level as S. altissima L.
Perennial herb with rhizomes, occasional in Oak Creek Canyon and the West Fork, as well as along the Northern Rim Country in draws, with infrequent observations from further down in the Red Rock Country in dry washes. Similar in habit to S. velutina, but tending to prefer moister locations, sometimes growing close to the water's edge; Edward Gilbert 185 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 185 [ASC]
Perennial herb, absent, based on one collection from Oak Creek Canyon in 1943. This taxon is found in locally frequent populations on the Rim Country just north of our area, and around the Peaks north of Flagstaff.
Perennial herb with rhizomes, infrequent, in our area found only in the upper reaches of the West Fork of Oak Creek and its tributaries, on slopes in Ponderosa Pine forests. Our plants belong to var. simplex.; M. Licher 11 [ASU]
Perennial herb with rhizomes, frequent, in Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries, the canyons of the Red Rock Country, up to the Rim Country and occasionally down into Lower Oak Creek, often forming extensive colonies on the forest floor in shady areas, generally away from the riparian zone
Perennial herb with rhizomes, occasional, in Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries, the canyons of the Red Rock Country, down into Lower Oak Creek and along Dry Beaver Creek, often in wash bottoms. This species is more prevalent than S. velutina in the lower elevations and drier habitats of the Red Rock Country; Edward Gilbert 331 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert... 331 [ARIZ]
Annual herb, occasional throughout the Red Rock Country and in Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries, usually in moderately moist or disturbed habitats. Introduced from Europe; Edward Gilbert 730 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 730 [ASC]
Annual herb, occasional throughout the Red Rock Country and in Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries, usually in moderately moist or disturbed habitats. More common as a garden weed than the former species. Introduced from Europe.; M. Licher 795 [ASU] , M. Licher 795 [ASC]
Perennial herb, absent, based on two collections from Oak Creek Canyon and Oak Creek Vista, in 1979 and 1946 respectively
Perennial herb with rhizomes, occasional throughout the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, reaching part way up into Oak Creek Canyon. The new treatment in FNA reverts to the original nomenclature of S. tenuifolia. According to that treatment, this species has rhizomes, while the following one does not. S. pauciflora is often denser and more rounded overall in habit. The other main characters that separate the two are the color of the pappus, with this one being white and plumose to the base, and S. paucifora being tawny and plumose 80% of the way to the base. In practice, there are many specimens in all the herbaria that are not definitive either way, and both folders end up looking very similar. I would probably place all of our specimens here, based on what I have seen in the field, but I am not confident enough to annotate the old specimens designated as S. pauciflora.
Annual herb, infrequent in the Red Rock Country, on bare soils between shrubs and trees; M. Licher 503 [ASC]
Perennial herb, occasional to locally frequent on the Rim Country, also in Oak Creek Canyon, becoming infrequent along Oak Creek down into the Red Rock Country. It is found in Pine forests on the rim, and in canyon bottoms below, away from the riparian zone. Two varieties exist: S. ericoides var. ericoides, which is rhizomatous, and S. ericoides var. pansum (S.F. Blake) G.L. Nesom [Aster pansus (S.F. Blake) Cronq.], which is not rhizomatous, but otherwise fairly similar. These taxa have been confused with Symphyotrichum falcatum (Lindley) G.L. Nesom - WHITE PRAIRIE ASTER [Aster falcatus Lindley, Virgulus falcatus (Lindley) Reveal and Keener, Aster commutatus (Torrey and Gray) Gray], due to the past Arizona treatments in Kearny and Peebles and McDougall, which recognized only one taxon, Aster commutatus (Torrey and Gray) Gray. S. ericoides has denser arrays of more flowers, each with smaller involucres and fewer ray florets than S. falcatum. All of our specimens appear to fall in the range of the former, even though most specimens are currently labeled as the latter. Most specimens do not have enough of the root system attached to separate the two varieties. My own specimens from Oak Creek Vista are rhizomatous and thus would fall under var. ericoides
Perennial herb with rhizomes, occasional in Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries, also in Lower Oak Creek, usually forming colonies on the fringe of the riparian zone
Annual herb, occasional along Lower Oak Creek and Dry Beaver Creek, and in moist waste places in and around Sedona. The new treatment in FNA calls this taxon Symphyothichum sublatum (Michaux.) G.L. Nesom var. parviflorum (Nees) S.D. Sundberg
Perennial herb, occasional in Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries, on the Rim Country, and in the upper canyons of the Red Rock Country, more often in shady and moister areas. Introduced from Europe. This is differentiated from the following more common species by the reddish color of its seeds, rather than the olive brown of those in T. officinale. It may be more common, as most observations of this plant not in seed are probably attributed to T. officinale. The new treatment in FNA calls this Taraxacum erythrospermum Andrzejowski ex Besser; Edward Gilbert 685 [ASU]
Perennial herb, frequent in Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries, on the Rim Country, and in disturbed, somewhat moist areas everywhere. Introduced from Europe, and common as a yard weed; Edward Gilbert 671 [ASU]
Perennial herb, occasional throughout the Red Rock Country and House Mountain areas, and into the lower reaches of Oak Creek Canyon, usually in open soils between shrubs and trees. Arizona specimens belong to var. arizonica (Greene) Parker
Small shrub, occasional throughout the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, often locally abundant on rocky exposed hillsides
Suffrutescent perennial herb, infrequent throughout the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas
Annual herb, occasional throughout the Red Rock Country, sometimes locallly abundant in open soils and clearings in the Pinyon juniper woodland
Perennial herb, infrequent on the Northern Rim Country only, more common at higher elevations in clearings in the Ponderosa Pine forests; Edward Gilbert 589 [ASU]
Perennial herb, infrequent in the Red Rock Country, in slightly rougher terain than T. annua typically
Biennial herb, occasional but widespread throughout our entire area, with the exception of the more xeric areas of the Red Rock Country and House Mountain. Introduced from Europe; Edward Gilbert 134 [ASU]
Biennial herb, rare in our area, with one collection from the Call of the Canyon area in Oak Creek Canyon, near the ruin site of an old lodge. Introduced from Europe; Edward Gilbert 58 [ASU]
Annual herb, occasional but widespread throughout our entire area with the exception of the Rim Country, sometimes locally abundant in good years; E. Gilbert 598 [ASC]
Annual herb, frequent in disturbed areas and old fields throughout the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, and along Lower Oak Creek. This species does not appear much on our Rim Country, although it becomes locally abundant again around Flagstaff, filling fields on the outskirts of town
Perennial herb, occasional along the Northern Rim Country, and in the upper draws of the West Fork of Oak Creek and its tributaries, in Pine forests. Also collected near Foxboro Lake on the Eastern Rim Country in 1950; M. Licher 618 [ASC] , M. Licher 634 [ASC]
Annual herb, abundant and widespread in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, often forming large golden fields in desert grassland habitats in good years. Occasional in clearings on the Rim Country also. In FNA, this taxon is treated as Xanthisma gracile (Nutt.) Morgan and Hartman
Perennial herb, occasional in Pinyon juniper, oak woodland, and chaparral throughout the Red Rock Country, ranging up to the Rim Country on more xeric slopes. In FNA, this taxon is treated as Xanthisma spinulosum (Pursh.) Morgan and Hartman
Annual herb, locally abundant in cattle tanks and seasonally wet or disturbed areas from the Rim Country to the lower elevations in the Red Rock Country, Savanna, and House Mountain areas
Perennial herb, rare in our area, but occasionally found in lower elevations in the Verde Valley, collected from one location location along Bill Gray Road at the western border of the Savanna area.
Evergreen Shrub, occasional in the Red Rock Country and Savanna areas, overlapping with the following species but preferring slightly higher and less xeric locations
Evergreen Shrub, frequent in the Red Rock Country, Savanna, and House Mountain areas, more widespread and common than B. fremontii in our area, and ranging further south from the Rim Country areas into the desert scrub areas of the Verde Valley
Deciduous Shrub with rhizomes, occasional in Oak Creek Canyon, the upper canyons of the Red Rock Country, and in sheltered draws along the Rim Country, often forming colonies on the forest floor; E. Gilbert 198 [ASC]
Deciduous monoecious tree, abundant along the full length of Oak Creek in our area, becoming the dominant riparian tree in Upper Oak Creek Canyon. This species must have perennial surface water, and is not found away from the creek in seasonal washes like many other of our riparian trees; Edward Gilbert 251 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 251 [ASC]
Deciduous monoecious tree, infrequent in the lower section of the West Fork of Oak Creek and in Oak Creek Canyon near the confluence, in the shelter of larger trees in the canyon bottom. There is also a reliable observation from one of the Red Rock Country canyon washes; Edward Gilbert 670 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 681 [ASU]
Deciduous tree, infrequent along Oak Creek, persisting from early cultivation in Sedona and Oak Creek Canyon as a shade tree, and becoming naturalized occasionally where sufficient moisture exists. Introduced from the Southeastern United States
Deciduous tree, occasional in dry washes in the Red Rock Country, Savanna, and House Mountain areas, and in sandy cobbles of the flood zone along Lower Oak Creek
Annual herb, infrequent in the Red Rock Country and along Lower Oak Creek, often growing in the shelter of larger shrubs or rocky ledges
Annual herb, frequent in the Red Rock Country and House Mountain areas. Our most common and robust annual Cryptantha; M. Licher 548 [ASC] , M. Licher 451 [ASC]
Perennial herb, infrequent in the House Mountain area on rocky hillsides. Arizona plants should belong to var. cinerea, according to the Intermountain Flora. However, USDA recognizes more varieties, several of which are shown for our state
Annual herb, infrequent in the Red Rock Country. More common on the Colorado Plateau to the north; M. Licher 550 [ASC]
Annual herb, infrequent in the Red Rock Country and House Mountain areas.
Annual herb, occasional in the Red Rock Country and along the slopes just under the Northern Rim Country; Edward Gilbert 622 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 622 [ASC] , M. Licher 501 [ASC]
Annual herb, infrequent in the Red Rock Country
Annual herb, frequent in the Red Rock Country and House Mountain areas, similar in habit and range to C. barbigera, but with narrower leaves and more appressed stem hairs; M. Licher 434 [ASC] , M. Licher 506 [ASC]
Annual herb, occasional in the Red Rock Country and House Mountain areas.
Evergreen shrub with rhizomes, forming dense colonies in some areas, occasional throughout the Red Rock Country and House Mountain areas, and into the lower portion of Oak Creek Canyon; Edward Gilbert 882 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 923 [ASU] , M. Licher 152 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 882 [ASC]
Annual herb, known from several populations on the southwest slope of Schuerman Mountain in the Red Rock Country. A Sonoran Desert species at the high end of its elevation range
Biennial or perennial herb,infrequent in the upper reaches of the West Fork of Oak Creek Canyon, in Pine forests. Possibly also in Oak Creek Canyon proper, based on an old 1928 record by C. Deaver; Edward Gilbert 122 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 122 [ASC]
Annual herb, absent, based on one Sedona collection from 1960
Perennial herb, rare in our area on the Northern Rim Country in clearings in Ponderosa Pine forests. More common further north and east on the Rim Country
Perennial herb, locally abundant in Upper Oak Creek Canyon and West Fork, in shady areas on the forest floor. Infrequent in the upper reaches of canyons in the Red Rock Country; Edward Gilbert 175 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 37 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 546 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 37 [ASC]
Annual herb, infrequent in the lower elevations of the Red Rock Country and House Mountain areas. It is distinguished from the more common variety below in having the nutlet margins inflated, forming a cuplike structure to which the spines are attach
Annual herb, occasional in the Red Rock Country, Savanna, and House Mountain areas, as well as along the Rim Country. Sometimes locally abundant in good years.
Perennial herb, occasional in the Red Rock Country and House Mountain areas, reaching up into the lower section of Oak Creek Canyon, in open, rocky and bare soils
Perennial herb, occasional in Oak Creek Canyon and the upper reaches of the Red Rock Country canyons, and in draws along the Rim Country, usually on the forest floor. Overlapping in range with the former species in the mid-elevations of the Red Rock Country canyons; Edward Gilbert 652 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 109 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 109 [ASC]
Perennial herb, occasional in Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries, in shady areas on the forest floor; Edward Gilbert 473 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 253 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 473 [ASC]
Perennial herb, locally frequent on the Rim Country in Pine forests
Annual herb, infrequent in clearings in Pondreosa Pine Forests and in draws along the Northern Rim Country; Edward Gilbert 398 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 518 [ASU] , M. Licher 314 [ASC]
Annual herb, infrequent on open soils in the Red Rock Country; M. Licher 406 [ASC]
Annual herb, infrequent on open soils in the Red Rock Country
Annual herb, occasional on open soils in the Red Rock Country, Savanna, and House Mountain areas, locally abundant in good years. One record from the Upper Oak Creek Canyon; M. Licher 454 [ASC] , M. Licher 507 [ASC] , M. Licher 431 [ASC]
Annual herb, locally abundant in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas in good years, usually under the shelter of Junipers and shrubs.; M. Licher 504 [ASC] , M. Licher 455 [ASC]
Annual herb, occasional in good years in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas. This plant looks very similar to Phacelia crenulata var. ambigua, but differs in its more brittle stems, flowers with less exserted stamens, and smaller seeds. It appears to be the common species of this group in the Verde Valley.
Annual herb, absent, based on one collection from Oak Creek Canyon (annotated so by Atwood) in 1950.
Annual herb, occasional in good years in the Red Rock, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, often growing in the shelter of shrubs
Annual herb, locally frequent in good years in the Red Rock, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, often growing in the shelter of trees and shrubs
Biennial or short-lived perennial herb, frequent in the canyons of the Red Rock Country, Oak Creek Canyon, and up onto the Rim Country, usually in forested areas; Edward Gilbert 63 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 283 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 63 [ASC]
Suffrutescent perennial herb, rare in our area, based on one collection north of Sycamore Pass, growing on a rock face.
Annual herb, absent, based on one collection by C.Deaver in Oak Creek Canyon in 1928. This is an anomalous collection, in that this is a rere species endemic to the cinder cones area NE of Flagstaff, so this is both out of normal range and habitat.
Annual herb, occasional on open soils in the Red Rock Country, Savanna, and House Mountain areas, locally abundant in good years
Annual herb, rare in our area, known from one location in the Red Rock Country canyons, where a locally frequent population was found in 2010.
Annual herb, documented only from the margins of Foxboro Lake, common around receding tanks on the Rim Country to the north and east of our area.
Annual herb, infrequent on open soils in the Red Rock Country; M. Licher 410 [ASC] , M. Licher 549 [ASC] , M. Licher 405 [ASC]
Suffrutescent perennial herb, occasional in the House Mountain area and on rocky hillsides above Lower Oak Creek, more common at lower elevations in the Verde Valley
Annual herb, rare in our area, known from one collection along the old 89A grade west of the Red Rock High School. Introduced from Eurasia
Perennial herb, occasional in the West Fork of Oak Creek only, in cobbles adjacent to the stream in the riparian zone. Sharing the same habitat, but more common than Arabis glabra. This is our only Arabis that stays in the genus in the upcoming FNA treatment
Annual herb, infrequent in the canyons of Red Rock Country, in semi shady juniper/oak woodland habitats
Biennial or perennial herb, absent, collected once in Oak Creek Canyon in 1960. This taxon is more common on the Rim Country around Flagstaff and east of our area.
Perennial herb, rare in in pine forests along the Northern Rim Country. This taxon has been often confused with the more common Arabis gracilipes because the key in McDougall used the number of cauline leaves to separate the two, which turns out to be an unreliable characteristic. However, this species can be more readily separated by the cilliate nature of its basal leaves, which is not the case with A. gracilipes. Correspondence with Micheal Windham indicates that this taxon will be called Boechera fendleri (S. Watson) W.A. Weber, in the upcoming FNA (the Intermountain Flora also treats it so, along with the rest of the following Arabis changes)
Perennial herb, occasional along the Rim Country in pine forests and open chaparral slopes, ranging infrequently down into the Red Rock Country canyons. This taxon will be called Boechera gracilipes (Greene) Dorn, in the upcoming FNA
Perennial herb, occasional and widespread throughout most of our area, in all but shady and riparian habitats. Our most common Rockcress by far. This taxon will be called Boechera perennans (S, Wats.) W.A. Weber, in the upcoming FNA.; E. Gilbert 3 [ASC]
Annual herb, infrequent in the Red Rock Country, appearing off and on in disturbed areas. Introduced from Europe
Annual herb, infrequent in the Red Rock Country, but forming locally abundant populations, mostly along Highway 89A in Sedona. This plant first appeared in the area somewhere around 2000, and has been spreading in good years, with the seeming potential to become a serious problem. It has also been observed in other parts of the Verde Valley, though not documented very well to date. On the noxious weed list for Arizona. Introduced from the Mediterranean area; M. Licher 399 [ASC] , M. Licher 386 [ASC]
Annual herb, rare in the Red Rock Country, known from one collection along the trail in Loy Canyon in Pinyon juniper woodland. Introduced from Eurasia
Annual herb, frequent from the Red Rock Country to the Rim, generally in areas with some moisture. One of our earliest winter annual weeds, appearing in late winter. Introduced from Europe; Edward Gilbert 584 [ASU] , M. Licher 373 [ASC]
Annual herb, occasional in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, as well as in Oak Creek Canyon. Introduced from Europe; M. Licher 982b [ASC]
Annual herb, infrequent in the upper draws of the West Fork of Oak Creek, in the shelter of rocky ledges and other herbs and shrubs; M. Licher 10 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 167 [ASU] , M. Licher 653 [ASC]
Annual herb, infrequent along the Rim Country and in Oak Creek Canyon.; Edward Gilbert 664 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 847 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 847 [ASC]
Annual herb, frequent and widespread throughout most of our area, in all but deeply shady and riparian habitats. Our most common Tansymustard by far.; Edward Gilbert 600 [ASU] , M. Licher 392 [ASC] , E. Gilbert 600 [ASC] , M. Licher 453 [ASC]
Annual herb, infrequent in the Red Rock Country. This subspecies has less divided leaves and longer siliques, and has been found growing side by side with the more frequent variety in the Red Rock Country, without any intergrading.
Annual herb, occasional in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, and in Oak Creek Canyon. Preferring slightly moister habitats that the former species, but also sometimes found growing with D. pinnata. Introduced from Eurasia
Annual herb, infrequent overall, but sometimes locally abundant (in sandy soils in Red Rock State Park) in the Red Rock Country, with one collection from the Eastern Rim Country
Perennial herb, occasional in the canyons of the Red Rock Country, in Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries, and in draws along the Rim Country, on the forest floor or in semi-sheltered locations; Edward Gilbert 5 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 631 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 5 [ASC]
Annual herb, frequent and locally abundant in good years, widespread throughout our entire area up to the Rim Country, but most common in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas; Edward Gilbert 603 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 603 [ASC]
Biennial or perennial herb, occasional in the canyons of the Red Rock Country, in Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries, and sometimes at lower elevations in the House Mountain and Savanna areas. The orange flowered plants formerly known as E. wheeleri tend to be more common at the higher elevations in the canyons, and the yellow colored ones are found more in the Red Rock Country, but not exclusively. USDA associates the common name of Western Wallflower with Erysimum asperum (Nutt.) DC., a separate species of the Great Plains, that some authors combined with this taxon in past floras; Edward Gilbert 107 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 601 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 378 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 647 [ASU] , more...
Annuall herb, infrequent but widespread, showing up in most sections of our area from the lower elevations of House Mountain, to the Rim Country at Oak Creek Vista and Foxboro Lake. Preferring, but not exclusive to, somewhat disturbed /overgrazed habitats, sometimes locally abundant in such places. Introduced from Europe
Perennial herb, occasional in the upper canyons of the Red Rock Country, in Oak Creek Canyon, and in draws along the Northern Rim Country, usually in forested areas.; Edward Gilbert 335 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 280 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 355 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 646 [ASU]
Biennial or perennial herb, rare in our area, known from one location in Oak Creek Canyon, in the marshy outflow area from the Pine Flat Spring. A small colony has persisted here for some years now. Seemingly our only collection of this species from Arizona (SEINET database search), and thus a new state record. Introduced from Europe, and naturalized across much of the United States north of our latitude; M. Licher 611 [ASC]
Perennial herb to subshrub, infrequent in our area in the Red Rock Country, but becoming more prevalent at lower elevations in the Verde Valley, especially on the Verde Formation soils. Our plants belong to var. alyssoides [Lepidium montanum Nutt. var. alyssoides (Gray) Jones].
Annual or biennial herb, occasional in the upper part of Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries, and along the Rim Country; Edward Gilbert 792 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 296 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 916 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 792 [ASC] , more...
Annual herb, frequent in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas. The most xeric of our Pepperweeds
Annual herb, frequent in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, and ranging up into the lower half of Oak Creek Canyon. It gets replaced by Lepidium densiflorum at higher elevations.
Annual herb, occasional in the southern part of the Red Rock Country and the House Mountain area. Differs from the more common and glabrous var. medium in having pubescent stems and siliques.
Annual herb, infrequent overall for the moment in our area, but forming locally dense infestations where found in the Red Rock Country around Sedona. This taxon is more frequent in some lower elevation sections of the Verde Valley, and has the potential for becoming invasive here also. It first became evident 5-10 years ago, and has been slowly increasing since. Introduced from Eurasia.
Perennial herb, locally abundant along Oak Creek, forming almost solid mats spanning the creek in the upper portions in recent years. Occasional in the perennial section of Dry Beaver Creek near the Stage Stop area along Hwy. 179. A riparian obligate. Introduced from Europe as an edible cultivated garden herb; Edward Gilbert 186 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 186 [ASC]
Perennial herb, occasional overall but locally abundant on the forest floor along the Rim Country and in Oak Creek Canyon, probably most prevalent in the West Fork, where it is one of the first prominent early spring wildflowers. Two varieties apparently exist in Arizona, var. montana, and var. fendleri (Gray) Kartesz, ined., which differ in petal and style length, with var. fendleri having the larger characters. All of our specimens have been labeled as belonging to var. fendleri, but this could be because that that has been the only taxon listed in Arizona Flora and in McDougall.
Perennial herb, infrequent in our area, known from several collections in the West Fork of Oak Creek Canyon, in the canyon bottom; M. Licher 277 [ASC]
Perennial herb, occasional in our area on open soils in the Red Rock Country and House Mountain areas. In the upcoming FNA, all Lesquerella will be transferred into Physaria (The Intermountain Flora has already done so), with this taxon becoming Physaria cinerea (S. Wats.) O'Kane and Al-Shehbaz. Reports of Lesquerella arizonica S. Wats. - ARIZONA BLADDERPOD, for our area are probably the result of using the bad key in McDougall, and should be L. cinerea. Lesquerella arizonica has linear basal leaves, and ovoid siliques that are quadrately flattened, as opposed to the spatulate basal leaves of L. cinerea and its orbicular siliques. L. arizonica is fould almost exclusively on the Colorado Plateau to the north of Flagstaff and I-40. Lesquerella cinerea is a central Arizona endemic, with the heart of its range being in the Verde Valley and Chino Valley areas
Annual herb, occasional throughout the Red Rock Country, and House Mountain areas, becoming seasonally abundant in good years in the Savanna area and lower elevations of the Verde Valley. This taxon will be called Physaria gordonii (Gray) O'Kane and Al-Shehbaz
Perennial herb, absent, based on one collection from Oak Creek Canyon in 1960. The primary range of this taxon is on the Colorado Plateau to the north of Flagstaff and on the Rim Country to the east of our area. This taxon will be called Physaria intermedia (S. Wats.) O'Kane and Al-Shehbaz.
Perennial herb, absent, known from one collection in Oak Creek Canyon in 1961.
Perennial herb, infrequent in our area, known from several collections, one in the upper end of Oak Creek Canyon in pine forests, and several from Jack's Canyon Wash below the Eastern Rim in Pinyon juniper woodland. This taxon will be called Physaria pinetorum (Woot. and Standl.) O Kane and Al-Shehbaz
Annual herb, has been collected at Casner Tank just above the Wilderness boundary in Casner Cabin Draw right outside our area. I believe that one old collection from upper Oak Creek Canyon in 1934 that was originally identified as Rorippa sylvestris (L.) Bess. represents this taxon also. It is found occasionally around tanks and seasonal wetlands on the Rim Country around Flagstaff
Perennial herb, occasional in the West Fork of Oak Creek and around the Foxboro Lake area on the Eastern Rim Country, in riparian areas. Several varieties are present in Arizona, but most specimens have not been determined to any. Those local specimens that have been, are labeled var. fernaldiana Butters and Abbe, which Intermountain Flora calls var. glabra (O.E. Schulz) R.L. Taylor and NacBride. These should probably be checked, since this variety was listed in the past as a synonym for the missapplied R. islandica, but is not necessarily so according to the more comprehensive list of synonomy now in the USDA database
Perennial herb, rare in our area, known from one collection at Foxboro Lake in 1976 on the Eastern Rim Country. This species is more common to the north and east of our area on the plateau in wetland areas and around stock tanks
Annual herb, occasional and widesperead in most habitats throughout our area, from the lower elevations of the Red Rock Country and House Mountain areas, up through Oak Creek Canyon to the Rim Country at Oak Creek Vista. Thriving in disturbed areas, but spreading out into natural ones also. This species typically has a more northern range in Arizona, while the following one (S. irio) tends towwards lower elevations in the south. Introduced from Europe
Annual herb, frequent to locally abundant below the rim in Oak Creek Canyon and the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas. One of our prominent weedy spring annuals, and liking a little more moisture than the previous species. Thriving in disturbed areas , but spreading out into natural ones also. Introduced from Europe; M. Licher 388 [ASC]
Annual herb, infrequent in the Red Rock Country, known mainly from several infestations at USFS trailheads, probably as an adventive after construction work. This taxon is less widespread in Arizona than the other two, and for the most part seems confined to lower elevations in the desert. Also introduced from Europe.; M. Licher 387 [ASC] , M. Licher 2001-04-01 [ASC]
Perennial herb, occasional and widesperead but usually solitary, in the Red Rock Country and House Mountain areas, and into the lower end of Oak Creek Canyon.
Biennial herb, occasional in the canyons of the Red Rock Country, and up through Oak Creek Canyon to the Rim Country. Hillsides and canyon bottoms, usually in more densly vegetated areas
Annual herb, occasional and widespread throughout most of our area, from the Red Rock Country and House Mountain, up through Oak Creek Canyon to the Rim Country
Biennial or perennial herb, infrequent in the West Fork of Oak Creek, in cobbles adjacent to the stream in the riparian zone. There is also an undocumented report from Red Rock State Park, on Lower Oak Creek. This taxon will be called Turritis glabra L. in the upcoming FNA.
Cactus, occasional in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, also on the Eastern Rim Country in more open clearings. The FNA treatment retains the older nomenclature for this taxon as Coryphantha vivipara, not recognizing the segregate genus Escobaria for those species with pitted seeds as the International Cactaceae Systematics Group (ICSG) has done
Cactus, occasional in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, in open habitats or sometimes scrambling up through trees and shrubs.
Cactus, occasional in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, usually in open clearings, a little more common and ranging further up the canyons than the previous species
Cactus, occasional and widespread throughout our entire area, from the lower elevations of the Red Rock Country and House Mountain to the Rim Country, preferring rocky ledges and slopes. This is a problematic taxon, in that according to FNA, E. triglochidiatus var. melanacanthus as originally treated by Benson contains both E. triglochidiatus and E. coccineus, which are genetically different (diploid and tetraploid respectively), but almost impossible to differentiate morphologically as evidenced by the new keys. Our area appears to be on the boundary of the two ranges, with E. triglochidiatus to the north on the plateau, and E. coccineus running through central and southern Arizona, according to FNA. Most collected specimens were identified prior to the new understanding of genetics in this group, and so are not of much help, nor is synonomy because of the conspecific nature of the former treatment. Discussions with Mark Winter in Dec. 2009, who was in the process of researching & writing the upcoming Intermountain Flora treatment for Echinocereus at the time, indicated that all of our specimens in the Verde Valley and Oak Creek Canyon would be E. coccineus
Cactus, occasional throughout the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, more common and often in more open areas than the previous species. Limited to the Pinyon Juniper community and habitats below this in elevation. Reports of true Echinocereus fendleri (Engelm.) Senke ex J.N. Hagge - FENDLER'S HEDGEHOG CACTUS. from our area are probably mistaken identifications of E. fasciculatus, based on the early keys in Arizona Flora and McDougall, or small single stemmed specimens. E. fendleri is more often than not single stemmed and somewhat flaccid compared to E. fasciculatus, more tuberculate than ribbed, and usually with only one central spine. There are no documented collections of E. fendleri from our area. USDA recognizes Echinocereus boyce-thompsonii Orcutt as a distinct species; however FNA subsumes this taxon in E. fasciculatus, without even giving it varietal distinction. The last two collections below are identified under this label
Cactus, rare in our area, known from a few locations on rocky south facing slopes above Lower Oak Creek near Hidden Valley.
Cactus, infrequent in the Red Rock Country and House Mountain areas, usually in open areas of rocky outcroppings
Cactus, frequent in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, and occasionally on the Rim Country. This taxon is one of our two most common cacti of the Sedona area, along with Opuntia phaeacantha (see below). Although the two are known to form hybrids in other areas, for the most part they remain distinct enough in our area for easy separation. Our native plants would belong to var. engelmannii.
Cactus, cultivated in Sedona as an ornamental and hedgerow, occasionally found as an escapee along roadsides.
Cactus, infrequent on the Rim Country and in the West Fork of Oak Creek Canyon, in more open areas of the forest floor, with rare occurences in the Red Rock Country; Edward Gilbert 1022 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 1021 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 879 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 1022 [ARIZ] , more...
Cactus, frequent in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, and occasionally on the Rim Country. This taxon is one of our two most common cacti of the Sedona area, along with Opuntia engelmanii (see above). The FNA treatment no longer recognizes var. major as distinct from var. phaeacantha; Edward Gilbert 1023 [ASU]
Perennial herb, infrequent in the West Fork of Oak Creek on rock faces and hanging garden areas. These specimens are unusual, and are somewhat intermediate between the two Arizona Campanula species; all the leaves are long and linear, with only occasional cilia on the petioles, the stems are clustered in large tufts, and branch, each branch bearing a terminal flower, none of which have teeth on the sepals. They are in need of more taxonomic work.
Perennial herb, absent, based on two collections by Deaver from Oak Creek Canyon in 1928, and one other anomalous (out of normal elevational range and habitat) collection from Boynton Pass in the Red Rock Country in 1975. This taxon is more common at higher elevations near Flagstaff and the Peaks, where it can be a frequent inhabitant of mountain meadows; E. Gilbert 737 [ASC]
Annual herb, occasional in the canyons of the Red Rock Country and in Oak Creek Canyon, and infrequently down into the Red Rock Country; Edward Gilbert 699 [ASU]
Annual dioecious herb, rare in our area, with a few scattered records from Sedona and along Oak Creek. Introduced from Asia for use as a drug (illegal at this point).
Deciduous tree, occasional throughout the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, both as part of the riparian habitat, where it can grow into a substantial tree, and as part of the Pinyon Juniper Woodland and Oak Woodland associations, where it can appear more shrublike. Our specimens belong to var. reticulata (Torr.) Benson - NETLEAF HACKBERRY [Celtis reticulata Torr.].
Vining perennial dioecious herb, occasional in Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries, infrequently found further down the Oak Creek corridor into the Red Rock Country. Climbing up through other shrubs and trees in the riparian zone. Arizona plants belong to var. neomexicanus A. Nels. and Cockerell
Deciduous trailing shrub, occasional in the West Fork of Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries along the rim, and also in some of the upper canyons of the Red Rock Country, in shady forested areas; Edward Gilbert 46 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 46 [ASC]
Deciduous shrub, somewhat trailing, rare in our area, known from one collection near the outlet to Foxboro Lake on the Eastern Rim Country, in the Ponderosa Pine forest. Differing from the far more common variety in that this one has shorter corolla
Deciduous shrub, somewhat trailing, occasional in the canyons of the Red Rock Country, along Oak Creek and up through Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries to the Rim Country, usually as an understory shrub in shady habitats.; Edward Gilbert 665 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 153 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 704 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 763 [ASU] , more...
Perennial herb with rhizomes, occasional in Oak Creek Canyon and West Fork, and in draws along the Northern Rim Country, generally in shady and moderately moist locations; Edward Gilbert 576 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 10 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 625 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 527 [ASU] , more...
Perennial herb, occasional in the upper portion of West Fork and its tributaries, usually in the canyon bottoms near the washbed or in meadows; Edward Gilbert 127-a [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 788 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 127-a [ASC] , E. Gilbert 788 [ASC]
Perennial herb, occasional in the upper canyons of the Red Rock Country, in Upper Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries, and in draws along the Northern Rim Country, usually in forested habitats. Two varieties are found in Arizona; our specimens belong to var. lanuginosa; Edward Gilbert 359 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 359 [ASC] , M. Licher 654 [ASC]
Annual herb, infrequent in Oak Creek Canyon and the canyons of the Red Rock Country, in moist locations; M. Licher 151 [ASU]
Annual herb, occasional in Oak Creek Canyon and the Red Rock Country, usually in the riparian zone. Introduced from Europe; Edward Gilbert 293 [ASU]
Annual herb, occasional in Oak Creek Canyon and the Red Rock Country, usually in moist areas but not restricted to the riparian zone. Also observed as a lawn and highway margin weed in Sedona; Edward Gilbert 565 [ASU] , M. Licher 983 [ASC] , E. Gilbert 565 [ASC]
Annual herb, infrequent but sometimes locally abundant when found in meadows in the Ponderosa Pine forests of the Upper West Fork tributaries.; M. Licher 8 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 829 [ASU]
Suffrutescent perennial herb, infrequent in the Red Rock Country, known only from several collections to the northwest of Sedona, on hillsides in Pinyon Juniper and Oak Woodland habitats. The new treatment in FNA Vol. 5 segregates this species from Arenaria, as Eremogone aberrans (M.E. Jones) Ikonnikov
Annual herb, infrequent but sometimes locally abundant when found in various habitats the Red Rock Country, from dry washes to open hillsides in the Pinyon Juniper Woodland. This is a relatively recent arrival, and observation shows it increasing quickly. Introduced from the Mediterranean area
Perennial herb with tuberous rhizomes, occasional and sometimes locally abundant in Oak Creek Canyon and its tributaries, especially in the West Fork, and in some of the upper canyons of the Red Rock Country. Usually found in shady areas of the forest floor; Edward Gilbert 40 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 19 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 19 [ASC]
Perennial herb with rhizomes, occasional along Oak Creek from Don Hoel's Cabins down stream, at least as far as Red Rock State Park, forming colonies in the floodway cobbles. Introduced from Europe as a landscape plant, and persisting at early habitation sites and becoming naturalized from there.
Annual herb, frequent and widespread throughout the entire area, from the lowest elevations of the Red Rock Country and House Mountain, to the upper draws along the Northern Rim Country, in most habitats with a moderate amount of sun.; Edward Gilbert 700 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 604 [ASU]
Perennial herb, absent, based on two collections from Oak Creek Canyon in 1928 by Deaver. However, it is found in the upper draws in pine forests along the Rim Country just outside our area, becoming more common further north and east near Flagstaff. Arizona plants belong to ssp. greggii (Gray) Hitchcock and Maguire.
Perennial herb, occasional in the upper draws along the Rim Country and infrequently down into Oak Creek Canyon. Becoming more common further north on the rim near Flagstaff and on the Peaks. Arizona plants belong to ssp. pringlei (S. Wats.) Hitchcock and Maguire; Edward Gilbert 386 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 973 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 412 [ASU]
Perennial herb, rare in our area, known from two locations, one in the floodway cobbles of Oak Creek Canyon, and on a hillside in Gamble Oak / Alligator Juniper Woodland in the upper reaches Hartwell Canyon
Annual herb, rare in our area, known from one collection in the West Fork of Oak Creek in 1989
Annual herb, infrequent overall, but usually locally abundant when found. Known from several collections in Oak Creek Canyon and at Red Rock Crossing. Introduced from Europe
Annual herb, infrequent overall, but usually locally abundant when found. Known from several collections in the Red Rock Country, growing sheltered near or under shrubs in wooded areas; M. Licher 464 [ASC]
Deciduous shrub appearing leafless (leaves reduced to tiny scales, soon falling), frequent in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, and on hillsides into the lower part of Oak Creek Canyon. It becomes one of the co-dominant species in a large portion of the Verde Valley, in the Creosotebush-Crucufixion Thorn Series of the Arizona Upland Division of the Sonoran Desert Scrub, often on limestone substrates. This particular association occurrs in the southern portion of the House Mountain area, and further south beyond our boundaries
Perennial herb with rhizomes, infrequent, but forming colonies where found in the riparian zone of West Fork. The taxonomy of this species is problematic. In past Arizona Floras, our specimens have been assigned to var. parviflora (DC.) Boivin - SMALLFLOWER GRASS OF PARNASSUS [Parnassia parviflora DC.]. However, both USDA and the more recent Utah Floras regard our specimens as belonging to var. montanensis (Fernald and Rydb. ex Rydb.) Hitch. - MOUNTAIN GRASS OF PARNASSUS. To compound the confusion, the recent Arizona Flora treatment by Patrick Elvander treats Arizona plants as Parnassia parviflora DC.
Low evergreen shrub, often appearing as a groundcover, occasional in Oak Creek Canyon and the upper canyons of the Red Rock Country, becoming more frequent in the West Fork of Oak Creek, in shady areas of the forest floor.; Edward Gilbert 11 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 14 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 14 [ASC]
Aquatic herb, has been found in the Verde River and in Oak Creek as far up as the Cornville area, but not yet recorded on Lower Oak Creek within our boundaries. It has been documented at Foxboro Lake on the Eastern Rim Country, but has not been seen there by the author in recent years.
Annual herb, infrequent in Oak Creek Canyon and the Red Rock Country, in moist soils. This variety differs from var. lutea in being taller, with larger, more showy flowers, with significantly longer filaments.
Annual herb, rare in our area, based on one collection from 1947 in West Sedona, and another observation from approximately 10 years ago in an evapotranspiration bed at the Catholic Church.
Annual herb, infrequent, occuring sporadically in Oak Creek Canyon but usually not persisting in our area. Much more common on the plateau country around Flagstaff
Annual herb, occasional in the Red Rock Country and House Mountain areas, usually in dry wash beds. Arizona plants belong to ssp. trachysperma (Torr. and Gray) Iltis - SANDYSEED CLAMMYWEED
Perennial herb, occasional in West Fork and Upper Oak Creek, and infrequently found in some of the upper Red Rock Canyons; Edward Gilbert 472 [ASU]
Perennial herb, locally frequent in Oak Creek Canyon and the lower section of West Fork, and occasional throughout the Red Rock Country, preferring sandy soils in canyon bottoms and meadow areas
Perennial herb, infrequent in draws along the Northern Rim Country, in Ponderosa Pine Forests
Perennial vining or trailing herb with rhizomes, occasional throughout the area from the lowest elevations of the House Mountain area and Lower Oak Creek, to both Rims, often forming dense stands along roadsides and in fields and yards, but also ranging into natural habitats along washes and draws on the Rim Country. Introduced from Europe. Listed as a noxious weed in Arizona.; M. Licher 613 [ASC]
Perennial vining or trailing herb, infrequent in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, with one record from Indian Gardens in Oak Creek Canyon; M. Licher 1443 [ASC]
Annual parasitic herb, infrequent in our area, collected in both the Red Rock Country near Sedona, and on the Rim Country near Foxboro Lake. Parasitic on herbs and grasses. All Cuscuta species are listed as noxious weeds in Arizon.
Perennial herb, occasional in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, often in open clearings on bare soils.
Annual vining or trailing herb, occasional and widely scattered throughout our area, from the Red Rock Country to the Rim Country
Annual vining or trailing herb, occasional throughout our area along Oak Creek and in canyons of the Red Rock Country, liking more moisture than the previous species, and also forming locally dense patches more so than the previous one.
Annual vining or trailing herb, occasional and widely scattered throughout the Red Rock Country, usually scrambling through shrubs
Perennial herb, infrequent in Ponderosa Pine forests on the Northern Rim Country; M. Licher 17 [ASU]
Deciduous shrub, locally frequent in the riparian zone of Oak Creek Canyon, and especially so in the West Fork. Arizona plants belong to ssp. sericea; Edward Gilbert 158 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 80 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 25 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 80 [ARIZ]
Perennial herb, occasional in the West Fork of Oak Creek and its upper tributaries along the Northern Rim Country, typically growing on north facing rocky ledges; Edward Gilbert 523 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 498 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 828 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 225 [ASU] , more...
Deciduous shrub, occasional in the Red Rock Country, in the Pinyon Juniper zone for the most part, often as part of the looser chaparral-like understory. Our plants appear to belong to var. aridum M.E. Jones
Perennial trailing monoecious herb, occasional in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, usually in sandy flats
Perennial vining monoecious herb, occasional in the southern part of the Red Rock Country and House Mountain areas, usually climbing up through shrubs and sometimes into trees
Evergreen monoecious tree, locally abundant, a dominant species in washes and on north facing slopes above drainages in the Red Rock Country
Evergreen dioecious tree, frequent in the Red Rock Country and on House Mountain. Listing of Juniperus monosperma (Engelm.) Sarg. - ONESEED JUNIPER, for this area in older floras are previous to the recognition of Juniperus coahuilensis as a distinct species. J. monosperma takes the place of J. coahuilensis to the northeast of our area on the Colorado Plateau. J. coahuilensis has smaller rose tinted berries that remain soft and juicy, compared to the larger pale bluish berries that are pithy on Juniperus osteosperma (see below). It also polinates in December and January, while Utah Juniper does so in February and March. Otherwise, the trees are difficult to tell apart in the field (although J. coahuilensis is often multi-trunked from the base, and J. osteosperma usually has a more well defined central and upright trunk). Our plants belong to var. arizonica R.P. Adams, which is being raised to spcies status by Adams in the 2nd. edition of Junipers of the World: The Genus Juniperus, as Juniperus arizonica (R.P. Adams) R.P. Adams - ARIZONA JUNIPER.
Evergreen dioecious tree, occasional in the canyons and along the Northern Rim Country, becoming locally dominant in areas on the Eastern Rim Country; Edward Gilbert 641 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 641 [ASC]
Evergreen monoecious tree, abundant, co-dominant species with Pinyon Pine throughout the Red Rock Country and on House Mountain, less frequent in the Savanna. See discussion above for differences with J. coahuilensis, with which it is most often confused
Evergreen dioecious tree, occasional, in the upper canyons and on the Northern Rim Country; Edward Gilbert 380 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 612 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 380 [ASC] , E. Gilbert 612 [ASC]
Perennial graminoid with rhizomes and tubers, introduced at the Sedona Constructed Wetlands in 2012.
Perennial clumping graminoid, barely entering our area along the rim country, but becoming more common at tanks and wetland areas further north and east of us. There is some question about its occurence in West Fork and Oak Creek Canyon, where occasionally Carex subfusca will have an inflorescence or two with long bracts like C. arthrostachya
Perennial graminoid, rare in our area, known from one collection in West Fork in 2000, but not seen since
Perenial graminoid, known only from Foxboro Lake in our area, but becoming more common further north and east of us in wetland areas above the Rim.
Perennial clumping graminoid, occasional in the lower canyons of the Red Rock Country, sometimes forming locally frequent populations on the forest floor, outside of the riparian area; Edward Gilbert 538 [ASU] , M. Licher 469a [ASC] , M. Licher 509 [ASC]
Perennial clumping graminoid, occasional along the margin of Lower Oak Creek, with one record as far north as Indian Gardens in Oak Creek Canyon.
Perennial clumping graminoid, frequent in dryer habitats in forests along the Rim Country and in Upper Oak Creek and West Fork, and occasional in the Red Rock Country canyons; Edward Gilbert 674-b [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 885 [ASU] , M. Licher 161 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 762 [ASU] , more...
Perennial rhizomatous graminoid, known in our area from one population in Upper Oak Creek near a small seep/spring. Much more common on the rim country to the north, usually in moist meadow and riparian habitats.
Perennial rhizomatous graminoid, locally abundant in one location in Oak Creek Canyon near Indian Gardens, forming large areas of ╥turf╙ adjacent to the wetland area below Thompson Spring; M. Licher 569 [ASC] , E. Gilbert 578 [ASC]
Perennial clumping graminoid, locally frequent in West Fork only, in dryer habitats on the forest floor; M. Licher 156 [ASU] , M. Licher 154 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 674-a [ASU]
Perennial clumping graminoid, locally abundant along the full length of Oak Creek within our area, and in West Fork, usually growing along the water's edge or as hummocks in the stream itself; M. Licher 510 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 22 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 672-a [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 673 [ASU] , more...
Perennial rhizomatous graminoid, occasional on the forest floor in draws and meadows along the Northern Rim Country and in Upper West Fork and its tributaries, not in the riparian area.; M. Licher 157 [ASC]
Perennial clumping graminoid, introduced at the Sedona Constructed Wetlands in 2012. Normal range is at higher elevations along the Mogollon Rim to the east of Sedona.
Perennial clumping graminoid, infrequent in forests in the Red Rock Country canyons and along the Rim Country.
Perennial clumping graminoid, infrequent along Oak Creek and in Lower West Fork, usually growing at the water's edge.; M. Licher 3 [ASU]
Annual graminoid, infrequent overall, but with locally dense populations growing at the water's edge in a few locations along Lower Oak Creek and Dry Beaver Creek. Introduced from Europe
Perennial graminoid, occasional along Lower Oak Creek and Dry Beaver Creek.
Perennial graminoid with rhizomes and tubers, occasional along Lower Oak Creek and Dry Beaver Creek
Perennial graminoid, frequent in sandy flats and meadows in Upper Oak Creek Canyon and along the Rim Country, often in Pine forests; Edward Gilbert 368 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 466 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 476 [ASU] , M. Licher 288 [ASC] , more...
Perennial graminoid with rhizomes, frequent along Lower Oak Creek and Dry Beaver Creek, forming dense colonies along the water's edge.
Annual graminoid, infrequent overall, but with locally dense populations along Dry Beaver Creek. More common at lower elevations in the Verde Valley
Perennial graminoid, occasional in sandy flats in the Red Rock Country canyons and along Oak Creek, but in drier habitats away from the riparian zone.; M. Licher 342 [ASC]
Annual graminoid, either rare in our area or overlooked, known from one specimen collected in Casner Canyon adjacent to the wash bed
Perennial graminoid, locally abundant around tanks and in wetland areas on the Rim Country
Perennial graminoid with rhizomes, locally abundant along Oak Creek, Dry Beaver Creek, and in wetland areas along the Rim Country; Edward Gilbert 754 [ASU]
Perennial graminoid with rhizomes, locally abundant along Lower Oak Creek. Becoming much more common at lower elevations in the Verde Valley, where it takes over from E. palustris
Perennial graminoid with rhizomes, rare in our area, known from one collection at Foxboro Lake on the Eastern Rim Country. I have examined this specimen, and no seeds are present (or accessible as most heads are encased in glue), so that an absolute verification is impossible. Most of the other Arizona specimens are found to the northwest of our area on the Rim Country and around Flagstaff
Perennial graminoid with rhizomes, infrequent in our area along Lower Oak Creek, and easily confused with S. tabernaemontani if mature spikelets are not present. This taxon tends to have fewer, fatter (more ovate) spikelets in our area, always clustered, and not ultimately drooping as much as those in S. tabernaemontani. FNA says that the two species hybridize
Perennial graminoid with rhizomes, locally abundant along Lower Oak Creek.
Perennial graminoid with rhizomes, infrequent along Lower Oak Creek.
Perennial graminoid with rhizomes, locally abundant along Lower Oak Creek and Dry Beaver Creek
Perennial graminoid with rhizomes, locally abundant along Oak Creek and in West Fork, more common in Oak Creek Canyon, and becoming less frequent further down into the Lower Oak Creek area; M. Licher 188 [ASC]
Perennial graminoid with rhizomes, known from one collection in West Fork. Rare in our area, becoming more common along the Mogollon Rim country to the east; also found to the west in Sycamore Canyon. EG 753.
Perennial herb, occasional, growing on rock and cliff faces in riparian areas of Oak Creek Canyon and its upper tributaries; Edward Gilbert 427 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 346 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 28 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 346 [ASC]
A hybrid between this species and C. bulbifera has been collected once on the north face of Munds Mountain, growing on rocky cliff faces
Perennial herb, occasional, on the forest floor in mesic, shady locations of the upper canyons; Edward Gilbert 125 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 155 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 521 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 430 [ASU] , more...
Perennial herb, rare, one collection from a north-facing crevice on the Eastern Rim
Perennial herb, locally abundant on the forest floor in Oak Creek Canyon and its upper tributaries, and occasionally along the Northern Rim Country.; Edward Gilbert 115 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 126 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 636 [ASU]
Perennial herb, occasional, on the forest floor in mesic areas of the upper canyons. Besides Bracken, our only other large terrestrial forest fern.; Edward Gilbert 966 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 966 [ASC]
Perennial herb, absent, based on one collection from Boynton Canyon in 1954. Most Arizona specimens are from the southern half of the state, but one other more recent collection exists from Sycamore Canyon
Perennial herb, infrequent, in rock crevices in the upper reaches of the West Fork of Oak Creek Canyon; Edward Gilbert 429 [ASU]
Perennial herb, rare in our area, based on two collections from northern canyons in the Dry Creek basin
Deciduous small tree or large shrub, infrequent adventive in our area, known from a few scattered collections, in the Red Rock Country around Sedona, along the Beaverhead Flat Road in the House Mountain area, and in Oak Creek Canyon. Found in washes and in the riparian zone along rivers, but not seeming to thrive in Oak Creek. Introduced from Asia, and a serious pest further north in riparian areas on the Colorado Plateau
Aquatic herb, in our area found only in Foxboro Lake on the Eastern Rim Country.
Deciduous dioecious shrub, infrequent in our area, found in a few scattered locations in open areas of Pinyon Juniper woodland throughout the Red Rock Country; M. Licher 786 [ASC] , M. Licher 861 [ASC]
Deciduous dioecious shrub, occasional, found throughout the Red Rock Country and on House Mountain; M. Licher 787 [ASC]
Perennial herb, frequent, in riparian habitats throughout the area; Edward Gilbert 722 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 137 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 24 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 137 [ASC]
Perennial herb, frequent, in riparian and adjacent alluvial and mesic sandy habitats throughout the area
Perennial herb, infrequent, in riparian habitats, more common in the upper reaches of the Oak Creek drainages; Edward Gilbert 44 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 44 [ASC]
Perennial herb, infrequent, collected near the mouth of West Fork in Oak Creek Canyon. This is a sterile hybrid between E. hyemale and E. laevigatum
Evergreen shrub, occcasional in the canyons of the Red Rock Country and in Oak Creek Canyon, in Pinyon Juniper Woodland and Chaparral up to the Rim Country. Blooming later than the following species, and growing significantly larger in the shelter of narrower canyons.; Edward Gilbert 535 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 267 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 270 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 8 [ASU] , more...
Evergreen shrub, frequent in the Red Rock Country and in Oak Creek Canyon, as a major component of both Pinyon Juniper Woodland and Chaparral. This species is overall more prevalent than the former, is one of the first early bloomers in the spring, and ranges down out of the canyons more into the heart of the Sedona area. It has suffered more than other Chaparral species in the drought, and also does not recover well after fires.; Edward Gilbert 9 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 9 [ASC]
Suffrutescent perennial herb, infrequent in West Fork and the upper reaches of Oak Creek Canyon, in shady habitats on the forest floor; Edward Gilbert 319 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 756 [ASU]
Perennial saprophytic herb, infrequent in pine forests along the Rim Country and in the upper reaches of Oak Creek Canyon; Edward Gilbert 977-b [ASU]
Perennial herb, rere inour area, known only from several locations in West Fork, in shady habitats on north facing forested slopes; M. Licher 709 [ASU]
Annual monoecious herb, occasional to locally abundant from Lower Oak Creek up through Oak Creek Canyon to the Rim Country, in meadows, fields, or forest clearings, out of the riprian zone.; Edward Gilbert 864 [ASU]
Prostrate perennial herb, often appearing like an annual, occasional to locally abundant in the Red Rock Country and the Savanna areas, on open soils between shrubs; M. Licher 890 [ASC]
Perennial herb, infrequent on rocky hillsides in the Lower Oak Creek area.
Annual herb, occasional in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, usually in open flats
Perennial herb, occasional in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain, and Savanna areas, and into the lower portion of Oak Creek Canyon, on hillsides in the Pinyon Juniper Woodland. Chamaesyce chaetocalyx (Boiss.)Woot. and Standl. - BRISTLECUP SANDMAT [Euphorbia fendleri Torr. and Gray var. chaetocalyx Boiss.] supposedly differs from C. fendleri in having narrower leaves, more than 2x longer than wide, and longer appendages than the width of the glands. The keys that I could find vary in where they demark these characteristics, and I find that our specimens vary, some meeting one of the criteria but not the other, and most all having a range of leaf shapes on the same plant, with those closer to the inflorescence birng narrower. I do not feel that our specimens represent more than one moderately variable taxon.
Annual herb, often prostrate, occasional in the Red Rock Country, and from Lower Oak Creek up into Oak Creek Canyon, on flats and terrain out of the riparian zone; M. Licher 215 [ASC]
Annual herb, occasional in the Red Rock Country, and from Lower Oak Creek up into Oak Creek Canyon, often but not exclusively in disturbed areas, and frequent as a weed in the Sedona area proper; M. Licher 886 [ASC]
Annual herb, infrequent, primarily as a lawn and garden weed in the Sedona area, and in other disturbed places. Introduced from the Eastern US; M. Licher 213 [ASC]
Prostrate annual herb, rare in our area, in sandy washes and flats in the House Mountain area and reported from Red Rock State Park in the Red Rock Country. More common at lower elevations in the Sonoran Desert
Prostrate annual herb, occasional in the Red Rock Country and the House Mountain areas, particularly in Sedona as a yard weed. Introduced from South America.; M. Licher 216 [ASC] , M. Licher 1643 [ASC]
Annual herb, infrequent in the Red Rock Country, House Mountain area, and on the Eastern Rim Country, in open soils on hillsides in the Pinyon Juniper Woodland and Desert Scrub
Annual herb, often prostrate, frequent throughout our entire area in a variety of habitats other than riparian and deep forest shade; Edward Gilbert 399 [ASU] , Edward Gilbert 513 [ASU]
Prostrate annual herb, rare in our area, in sandy flats in the House Mountain area and at lower elevations in the Verde Valley
Prostrate annual herb, rare in our area, in open flats in the Savanna area and at lower elevations near Cottonwood
Annual herb, rare in our area, known from one collection in 1983 near Midgley Bridge in the mout of Oak Creek Canyon
Annual monoecious herb, rare in our area, known from one location in dry wash cobbles in Rattlesnake Canyon, along the Eastern Rim Country. These appear to be the only collections from Arizona in our state herbaria, although Kearny and Peebles mentions one collection by Mearns from the Santa Cruz River in southern Arizona (but this is not apparently in any of our state herbaria)
Annual dioecious herb, occasional overall but often locally abundant in the Red Rock Country and along Lower Oak Creek, usually in sandy soils
Perennial herb, infrequent in Oak Creek Canyon and in the West Fork and its upper tributaries along the Northern Rim Country, in Ponderosa Pine forests. Euphorbia palmeri Engelm. ex S. Wats. - WOODLAND SPURGE is recognized by the USDA Plants database, but The Intermountain Flora treats it as conspecific with Euphorbia brachycera. It supposedly has broader leaves than the latter, but in my examination of the ASC specimens, there seemed to be a full range of leaf shape in specimens identified as E. brachycera, overlapping characteristics with those few labeled as E. palmeri. For the present, I would threat these per The Intermountain Flora as one variable species; Edward Gilbert 571 [ASU] , E. Gilbert 571 [ASC]
Annual herb, infrequent in our area, known from disturbed areas. Plants with strigose capsules and narrowly lanceolate, entire leaves, have been called Euphorbia cuphosperma (Engelm.) Boiss - HAIRY-FRUIT SPURGE [Euphorbia dentata Michx. var cuphosperma (Engelm.) Fernald]. Collections from Call of the Canyon have moderately hairy fruits, but the leaves look more like typical E. dentata. Patrick Alexander reports from New Mexico that these traits supposedly separating the two are not consistent and can be found independently in varying degrees on different populations. Based on both my own and his observations, I do not find it tenable to sparate these two species. Intermountain Flora calls our plants Euphorbia davidii Subils - DAVID'S SPURGE, a more recently described species/segregate, that differs in genetics and supposedly some subjective degree of morphological characteristics. Having no definitive key differences described in our floras, and no collections at ASC to compare, I am taking the position of Utah Flora and considering them conspecific for the moment, despite USDA recognizing both and showing both for our state. Intermountain Flora has good narrative for those wanting more background on E. davidii; Edward Gilbert 863 [ASU]
Annual herb, infrequent in the Red Rock Country and along Lower Oak Creek out of the riparian zone, in meadows and flats
Annual herb, occasional in the Red Rock Country and House Mountain area, in Pinyon Juniper Woodland; M. Licher 404 [ASC]